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Harrisonburg Names Sellers Interim Police Chief

November 7, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image Harrisonburg, Va. – The city of Harrisonburg has named an interim police chief who will begin work at the Harrisonburg Police Department (HDP) this week. Starting Wednesday, November 8, Steve Sellers, interim police chief, will begin his leadership role within HPD.

Sellers retired as chief from the Albemarle County Police Department (ACPD) in June 2016, where he served for more than five years. He was previously a deputy chief of police for the Fairfax County Police Department and has more than 34 years of law enforcement experience.

“We have the utmost confidence in the leaders at the police department to work with the interim police chief and continue the quality service our community has come to rely on,” explained Ande Banks, acting city manager.

It is anticipated that Interim Chief Sellers will oversee the operations at HPD until a new police chief is hired, which could be four to six months.

“I look forward to having the opportunity to work with the men and women of such a fine department,” explained Steve Sellers, interim chief of HPD. “I hope to help these officers continue to make a positive impact within their community, while also sharing strategies and lessons that I’ve learned through the years.”

The Harrisonburg Police Department is currently made up of 112 sworn officers and 26 civilian positions. Additional information about HPD can be found at www.HarrisonburgVA.gov/police.

The City of Harrisonburg is centrally located in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.  It is home to almost 55,000 people.  More information about the City of Harrisonburg is online at www.HarrisonburgVA.gov.

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For Immediate Release
November 7, 2017

Contact:
Mary-Hope Vass, Public Information Officer
540.432.8931
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Virginia Agencies Receive International Policing Awards | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia Agencies Receive International Policing Awards

October 24, 2017 | VACP

The Roanoke Police Department, Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department, Virginia State Police, Loudoun County Sheriff's Office, and FBI-Washington Field Office all received top awards Tuesday night at the 2017 International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference in Philadelphia, PA.

Virginia was heavily represented at the IACP Awards Banquet this year with agencies and individuals bringing home honors in five out of the fifteen awards.  Congratulations to all of the winners! 


IACP J. Stannard Baker Leadership in Highway Safety Award
Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Superintendent, Virginia State Police

The IACP J. Stannard Baker Leadership in Highway Safety Award recognizes individual law enforcement officers and others who have made outstanding lifetime contributions to highway safety.

Full Details: http://www.theiacp.org/JStannardBakerAwardforHighwaySafety

 

IACP/Booz Allen Hamilton Leadership in the Prevention of Terrorism Award
FBI-Washington Field Office, Loudoun Co. Sheriff’s Office & Virginia State Police

The IACP/Booz Allen Hamilton Leadership in the Prevention of Terrorism Award is given to agencies that have demonstrated overall success in averting, stopping or countering terrotist activity.

Full Details: http://www.theiacp.org/IACP-Booz-Allen-Hamilton-Terrorism-Award

 

IACP/Cisco Leadership in Community Policing Awards
Agencies Serving a Population of 50,001 – 100,000: Roanoke Police Department

The IACP/Cisco Leadership in Community Policing Award recognizes outstanding community policing initiatives undertaken by law enforcement agencies worldwide. The award identifies and rewards best practices in community policing by recognizing police organizations that use the power of collaboration and partnerships to make local, national, and global communities safer from crime and terrorism.

Full Details: http://www.theiacp.org/Community-Policing-Award

 

IACP Leadership in the Prevention of Vehicle Crimes Award
Virginia State Police

The IACP Leadership in the Prevention of Vehicle Crimes Award recognizes law enforcement agencies, task forces, councils, community partnerships, and other theft prevention alliances worldwide for their theft prevention and/or enforcement programs.

Full Details: http://www.theiacp.org/VehicleTheftAwardofMerit

 

IACP Leadership in Victim Services Award
Small Agency Category: Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department

The IACP Leadership in Victim Services Award recognizes law enforcement agencies that demonstrate excellence in providing innovative services to crime victims by successfully integrating current best practices of enhanced victim response into all facests of their organizations. The award recognizes agencies that best exemplify an organizational philosophy of placing victims at the center of their problem-solving efforts, utilizing effective partnerships, training methods, and performance monitoring tools to enhance response to victims of crime.

Full Details: http://www.theiacp.org/IACP-LOGIN-Excellence-in-Victim-Services-Award

Strasburg captain named town’s next police chief | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Strasburg captain named town’s next police chief

October 13, 2017 | Virginia News

STRASBURG — Strasburg Police Department Capt. Wayne Sager is going to become the town’s next police chief.

In a unanimous decision, the Town Council on Tuesday chose Sager following a brief search among town employees. The search started after Police Chief Tim Sutherly announced his plans for retirement in January 2018.

Sager will begin work as chief sometime between Jan. 11 and Jan. 31.

Capt. Sager is currently enrolled in the 41st Session of the VACP's Professional Executive Leadership School (PELS).

Sam Roman sworn in as Lexington police chief | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Sam Roman sworn in as Lexington police chief

October 2, 2017 | Virginia News

LEXINGTON, Va. - After more than a year without permanent leadership in the Lexington Police Department, the city has a new police chief on the job.

Samuel Roman Jr. was officially sworn into office Monday. Roman has 25 years of experience in law enforcement and retired from the Roanoke City Police Department as a deputy chief.

The chief says he's ready to start a new chapter in his career and continue engaging with the community, something he says the Lexington Police Department is already good at doing.

"Throughout this state, there are many police chief jobs that are open but I just wasn't looking for a job. I was looking for something I can be committed to and the Lexington police family just seems like the right fit. In fact, Lexington was the only place in which I applied to become chief of police," said Roman

Roman said he went through an extensive process before being selected for the job.

Roman’s training includes the Command College (University of Virginia); the Professional Executive Leadership School (University of Richmond); Leadership Collaboration in Government (Harvard University); Lean Management for Executives (Virginia Polytechnic Institute); the Executive Command Leadership program; and the FBI National Academy.

A native of Brooklyn, Roman served in the United States Marine Corps. He began his career in public service with the Roanoke Police Department. Roman has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice and he is a member of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police and the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

The former Lexington police chief, Al Thomas, left to become the police chief in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Mark Riley served as interim police chief since May 6, 2016. He will become the deputy chief.

Source URL: https://www.wsls.com/news/virginia/lexington/roman-takes-office-sworn-in-as-lexington-police-chief

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VACP Installs 2017-2018 Executive Board | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Installs 2017-2018 Executive Board

September 20, 2017 | VACP

News Image Chesapeake Chief Kelvin Wright Elected VACP President

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police on September 19 installed the 2017-2018 VACP Executive Board during the Valor Awards Banquet of the association’s annual conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia.  The new board members are:


PRESIDENT – Chief Kelvin L. Wright, Chesapeake – Chief Wright was appointed chief of police in Chesapeake in 2008, and has been a champion for change in the agency and for crime reduction in the community.  Chief Wright has a Bachelor’s of Science Degree, Cum Laude, in Sociology from Saint Leo University and a Master in Public Administration from Troy University. He is active in developing leadership education programs for the Association.

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT — Colonel Thierry Dupuis, Retired, Chesterfield County – Colonel Dupuis was appointed the chief of police for the Chesterfield County Police Department in 2007. Colonel Dupuis has served within all major divisions within the department. He is the 7th chief in the department's history and the first to have held all ranks within the department including officer, sergeant, lieutenant, captain, major and lieutenant colonel.  Colonel Dupuis holds an associate degree in applied science from John Tyler Community College, a Bachelor of Science degree from Virginia Commonwealth University and a Master degree in business administration from Averett College. He retired as Chesterfield County chief of police in August, 2017.

1ST VICE PRESIDENT — Chief Douglas A. Goodman, Ashland – Chief Goodman was appointed Ashland police chief in 2008, where he has worked to enhance organization productivity and effectiveness.  The Ashland Police Department is the smallest police department in the Commonwealth to have earned and maintained CALEA accreditation.  Since 2008, the work of the men and women in APD has resulted in numerous state and national awards. Chief Goodman holds a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Sociology from Virginia Tech and a Master in Public Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Virginia Center for Policing Innovation. He also remains an active Team Leader Assessor for CALEA.

2ND VICE PRESIDENT – Chief Howard Hall, Roanoke County – Chief Hall was appointed to lead the Roanoke County Police Department in August 2012 after 25 years of service with the Baltimore County Police Department. He joined the Baltimore County Police in 1986 upon graduation from the University of Maryland, where he received a B.A. in Government and Politics. Chief Hall spent 20 years with the BCPD as a commander and gained experience in the areas of patrol, traffic, special operations, training, administration, accreditation compliance, and human resources. In addition to receiving a Master of Public Administration from the University of Baltimore in 1995, Hall attended the F.B.I National Academy and holds a Graduate Certificate in Police Administration. Hall is also a certified instructor and nationally recognized expert in data-driven policing – where data and analysis are used to guide police operations and solve issues. He is an active member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and serves on the organization’s Highway Safety Committee. Hall also serves as co-chair of the Virginia Highway Safety Committee.

3RD VICE PRESIDENT – Chief Maggie DeBoard, Herndon – Chief DeBoard has been the Herndon Chief of Police since 2012, after serving 26 years with the Fairfax County Police Department where she rose to the rank of Deputy Chief.  She has an M.A. in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense) from the Naval Postgraduate School, a B.S. in Criminal Justice from George Mason University, and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and the WestPoint Leadership program. In 2017, she was appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe to the Virginia Forensic Science Board for a four-year term. Chief DeBoard serves as President of the Virginia Chapter of the Police Unity Tour, which was formed to raise awareness of all officers killed in the line of duty, and to raise funds for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) in Washington, D.C. She serves as a member of the Board of Governance of the Northern Virginia Regional Intelligence Center.


EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS
Chief A. J. Panebianco, Middleburg – Chief Panebianco has been the police chief in Middleburg since April, 2012.  He previously served as Chief of Police in Louisa, Warsaw and Buena Vista.  Chief Panebianco has a Bachelor of Science in the Administration of Justice from Bluefield College, and is a graduate of the Professional Executive Leadership School at the University of Richmond.  He currently chairs the VACP's Professional Image & Ethics Committee and serves on the Awards Committee and Budget & Finance Committee of the VACP. (2014-2018 term)

Chief Thomas Bennett, Suffolk – Chief Bennett has served as the Suffolk Police Chief since 2009 after serving as Newport News Assistant Chief of Police.  He has a Master of Public Administration from Old Dominion University, and a B.A. in Criminology from St. Leo College.  Chief Bennett graduated from the 200th Session of the FBI National Academy, and from the 35th Session of the Police Executive Resource Forum Senior Management Institute for Police.  He is a Certified Team Leader and Assessor for the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, and has served as President of the Hampton Roads Chiefs of Police Association. (2016-2020 term)

Chief Bradly Rinehimer, James City County – Chief Rinehimer became the James City County Police Chief in 2013, and has previously served as President of the Hampton Roads Chiefs of Police Association.  He has extensive experience instructing in a variety of specialties in the criminal justice field for both private and public sectors, and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the Professional Executive Development School, and the FBI's Law Enforcement Executive Development School. Chief Rinehimer has a M.S. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati, and a Bachelors in Criminology from St. Leo University. (2016-2020 term)

Chief Craig Branch, Germanna Community College — Chief Branch was appointed Germanna Community College Chief of Police in 2011. He has more than 20 years of law enforcement and public safety experience in Virginia and the District of Columbia.  He previously worked for the J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Police Department where he served as an Interim Chief and Deputy Chief of Police. He also has worked for the Virginia State University Police Department and the Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department   Chief Branch has a bachelor’s degree from Virginia State University.  He currently serves as a member of the Virginia Criminal Justice Services Board, and previously served on the state Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice.  Chief Branch served as 2014-2016 president of the Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators. (2017-2021 term)

Chief Keith Hartman, Buena Vista — A Brooklyn, N.Y., native, Richard Keith Hartman was hired by the Newport News Police Department in July 1992 and as a Captain spent time in patrol, investigations and training. He retired from the department after 23 years, to take the position as Buena Vista Police Chief in 2015.  Chief Hartman holds a master’s degree in public administration from Troy University and a bachelor’s degree from Saint Leo University. He has participated in training at various law enforcement schools, including the FBI National Academy in Quantico, SMIP and PELS. He currently serves on the Rockbridge Area CSB Board of Directors and VPAS Board of Directors.  (2017-2021 term)

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

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PHOTO CAPTION:

2017-18 VACP Executive Board:
(front row, L to R) Second VP Chief Howard Hall, Roanoke County; Immediate Past President, Col. (Ret.) Thierry Dupuis, Chesterfield County, President Chief Kelvin Wright, Chesapeake; First VP Chief Doug Goodman, Ashland; and Third VP Maggie DeBoard, Herndon.

(back row, L to R) Board Members: Chief Brad Rinehimer, James City County; Chief Keith Hartman, Buena Vista; Chief Thomas Bennett, Suffolk; Chief AJ Panebianco, Middleburg; and Chief Craig Branch, Germanna Community College.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erin Schrad, VACP

CONTACT: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director – 804-338-9512 (mobile)

2017 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Winners Announced | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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2017 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Winners Announced

September 19, 2017 | VACP

News Image Henrico County Division of Police recognized with "Commonwealth Award" for best overall traffic safety program in Virginia in 2016; Hanover County Sheriff's Office recognized with 2016 NSA Traffic Safety Unit Award.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police (VACP) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge awards for the best traffic safety programs in the state in 2016. The awards luncheon took place during the VACP’s 92nd Annual Training Conference on Tuesday, September 19 in Virginia Beach, VA.

Celebrating its twenty-eighth year in Virginia, the Law Enforcement Challenge program promotes professionalism in traffic safety enforcement and encourages agencies to share best practices and programs with each other. The awards are based on entries prepared by the participating agencies that highlight their traffic safety education and enforcement activities in occupant protection, impaired driving and speed over the past calendar year. Judges award points to the agencies in the six areas that comprise a comprehensive traffic safety program: problem identification, policies, planning, training of officers, public information and education, enforcement, and an evaluation of the outcomes of the agency’s efforts.

The Virginia agencies listed below were presented with their first, second and third place state awards in each category at the awards luncheon, as well as special awards for outstanding enforcement and education efforts in the areas of occupant protection, impaired driving, speed awareness, commercial motor vehicle safety, distracted driving, technology, bicycle/pedestrian safety, and motorcycle safety.

Additionally, the VACP presented an award for the most outstanding traffic safety program in Virginia in 2016, regardless of agency size or type — the “Commonwealth Award”. This year, the Commonwealth Award goes to the Henrico County Division of Police.

Also presented at the Challenge Awards luncheon was an award from the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA). The recipient of the 2016 NSA Traffic Safety Unit Award is the Hanover County Sheriff’s Office. Additional information about this award is available from the NSA at https://www.sheriffs.org/content/traffic-safety-unit-award

The Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Awards program is supported by a grant from the Virginia Highway Safety Office. Additional information about the Law Enforcement Challenge program can be found online at http://www.smartsafeandsober.org/programs/LEC.

Congratulations to all of the winners!

DOWNLOAD VIRGINIA LAW ENFORCEMENT CHALLENGE AWARDS PRESS RELEASE:
Word document | Adobe PDF

PHOTOS OF 2017 VIRGINIA LEC AWARDS PRESENTATION

Municipal 1: 1-25 Officers Place Notes
Ashland Police Department 1  
Bedford Police Department 2  
Municipal 2: 26-60 Officers Place Notes
Herndon Police Department 1  
Culpeper Police Department 2 Special Award: Technology
Colonial Heights Police Department 3  
Municipal 3: 56-125 Officers Place Notes
James City County Police Department 1 Special Award: Occupant Protection
Harrisonburg Police Department 2 Special Awards:
Motorcycle Safety & Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety
Salem Police Department 3 Special Award: Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety
Municipal 4: 126-225 Officers Place Notes
Lynchburg Police Department 1  
Roanoke County Police Department 2  
Albemarle County Police Department 3  
Municipal 5: 226-425 Officers Place Notes
Roanoke Police Department 1  
Chesapeake Police Department 2  
Municipal 6: 426-800 Officers Place Notes
Henrico County Division of Police 1 Commonwealth Award Winner Special Award: Impaired Driving
Virginia Beach Police Department 2  
Municipal 7: 801+ Officers Place Notes
Fairfax County Police Department 1 Special Award: Traffic Incident Management
 
Sheriff 1: 1-50 Deputies Place Notes
Westmoreland County Sheriff's Office 1  
New Kent County Sheriff's Office 2  
Sheriff 2: 51-125 Deputies Place Notes
Gloucester County Sheriff's Office 1  
Washington County Sheriff's Office 2  
Montgomery County Sheriff's Office 3  
Sheriff 3: 126+ Deputies Place Notes
Stafford County Sheriff's Office 1 Special Award: Speed Awareness
Hanover County Sheriff's Office 2 National Sheriffs' Association 2016 Traffic Safety Unit Award
Fauquier County Sheriff's Office 3  
 
Special Enforcement Place Notes
Metro Washington Airports Authority Police Department 1 Special Award: Distracted Driving
 
University Police Place Notes
Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department 1  
University of Richmond Police Department 2  

 

Mrs. Jessica Sears Younce of Chesterfield County Recognized with 2016-17 VACP President’s Award | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Mrs. Jessica Sears Younce of Chesterfield County Recognized with 2016-17 VACP President’s Award

September 18, 2017 | VACP

News Image Each year, the President of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (VACP) selects an individual for the President’s Award to recognize their meritorious efforts on behalf of the law enforcement profession and Virginia’s criminal justice system.

This year, 2016-17 VACP President Colonel Thierry G. Dupuis, Ret. (Chesterfield County) is proud to recognize Mrs. Jessica Sears Younce.

Since 2008, Jessica Sears Younce has been dedicated to working with the law enforcement profession to increase awareness of the potentially harmful effects of high speed driving by police officers. By sharing her personal experience involving the tragic death of her late husband, Colonial Heights Police Lieutenant James Sears, Jessica delivers a law enforcement safety program from the point of view of the victim, which provides unforgettable insights. Her long-standing partnership with the Chesterfield County Police Department, as well as other driver education and safety entities, has seen her presentation reach different regions of the nation. 

Jessica has partnered with the Association of Law Enforcement Emergency Response Trainers (ALERT), an international organization devoted to the development and implementation of ongoing training relative to law enforcement emergency vehicle operation. In August 2010, ALERT invited Jessica to Indiana to produce a video version of her presentation. The video is available to all ALERT members and currently is used in numerous law enforcement agencies across the United States and Canada.

Her commitment to safety for all motorists and pedestrians, and the educational awareness that the presentation brings has caused recruits, officers, and others in law enforcement to become more aware of how they drive, even in emergency circumstances. By raising the awareness of police officers, she has no doubt saved the lives of others through her message of safety. Since the program’s inception, she has taught more than 8,400 law enforcement officers, as well as 355 high school aged criminal justice students. She has travelled to agencies throughout Virginia, Oklahoma and Georgia. The effectiveness of the program has seen her partner with the National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration to get compact discs of the presentation distributed to law enforcement academies across the country.  In 2012, Jessica was recognized for her efforts with the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police Award for Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement.

By the end of 2017, more than 10,000 law enforcement officers and recruits will have been touched by Jessica’s presentation. This contribution to the safety of public servants and the communities that they serve cannot be understated. Motor vehicle crashes continue to be a leading cause of death and injury for law enforcement. Through her gripping presentation, diligent efforts, and concern for traffic safety, Jessica Sears Younce has been lowering that risk. and is commended for her contributions. 

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The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

Photos are available at http://photos.vachiefs.org/VACP-Conferences/2017-VACP-Annual-Conference/

Photographer: Erin Schrad, VACP

Contact: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512 • Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Twelve Virginia Law Enforcement Officers Receive 2017 VACP Awards for Valor | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Twelve Virginia Law Enforcement Officers Receive 2017 VACP Awards for Valor

September 18, 2017 | VACP

News Image Officers from Chesapeake, Chesterfield County, Harrisonburg, Hopewell, Newport News, and Virginia State Police recognized for heroism.

On September 19, 2017, the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (VACP) presented twelve Virginia law enforcement officers from six agencies with the Association’s highest honor, the Award for Valor. The awards were presented during the Valor Awards Banquet at the VACP Annual Conference, held this year at the Wyndham Oceanfront Hotel in Virginia Beach.

The Award for Valor recognizes a law enforcement officer who, in the line of duty, performs an act of extraordinary heroism while engaged with an adversary at imminent personal risk.

Officers receiving the 2017 Awards for Valor are:

Chesapeake Police Department
Officer Heather R. Bishop
Officer Konrad V. Kaufman

On April 27, 2016, Chesapeake Police Officers Heather Bishop and Konrad Kaufman were dispatched to serve an emergency custody order. As Officer Bishop spoke with the subject’s mother in the residence, the subject entered and approached with a handgun. Officer Bishop quickly retreated but the subject began firing at the officers. They immediately sought separate cover.

The subject repeatedly emerged from cover and fired on both officers. Officer Kaufman was able to return fire several times before the subject focused his fire on him. Pinned down, Officer Kaufman radioed Officer Bishop to tell her to take the shot if she had it.

Officer Bishop stepped out from cover and fired four rounds at the subject, drawing his fire off of Officer Kaufman and allowing Kaufman to take a better position. The subject’s mother ran into the front yard and the subject fired one round at her, injuring her. Officer Kaufman then re-engaged the subject for what would be the last time. The subject fell down, wounded, but still had control of his weapon. Both officers repeatedly gave verbal commands that the subject ignored. Even wounded, he continued to attempt to grasp his weapon until he became physically unable to do so.

Officers Bishop and Kaufman performed at the highest possible level during this incident. Under a great deal of stress, they relied heavily upon their training and maintained contact with each other.  Their actions saved not only their own lives, but the lives of the two adults and four children inside the subject’s residence.

Since the incident, Officer Kaufman has joined the Roanoke Police Department.  We are honored to present Officer Heather Bishop and former Officer Konrad Kaufman with the VACP Award for Valor.

 

Chesterfield County Police Department
Officer First Class Christopher L. Hodges

In the early morning of November 24, 2016, Chesterfield County police officers were dispatched to an armed robbery in progress at a gas station. Officer First Class Christopher Hodges was working in an adjacent area and immediately responded to the emergency call along with fellow officers. After positioning his police cruiser behind the nearby Waffle House, Officer Hodges arrived on scene by foot approximately three minutes after the initial call was dispatched. Upon seeing Officer Hodges, the suspect immediately changed his direction of escape.

Knowing the subject was armed, Officer Hodges gave chase without hesitation. He swiftly ran between a dumpster and the Waffle House only to find himself under gun fire in the restaurant’s parking lot. As he ran for cover, Officer Hodges returned fire toward the wood line where the shooter was concealed, successfully changed his magazine, and then continued to fire at the suspect, striking him once. Shortly after, the wounded suspect crawled out of the woods and was taken into custody by assisting officers. The firearm used by the suspect and nine spent shell casings were later recovered from the woods. The suspect is now serving a sentence in prison.

Through his heroic and courageous actions, Officer First Class Hodges embodied the Chesterfield County Police Department’s mission of public service while courageously ensuring the safety of the community. He carried out his duty by pursuing an armed and dangerous subject, which put his life at risk. Officer Hodges is recognized for his bravery, tactical skill, and the high level of service displayed during this extremely dangerous and violent incident.

We are honored to present Officer First Class Christopher Hodges with the VACP Award for Valor.

 

Harrisonburg Police Department
Officer Joshua W. Joseph
Officer Dwayne Jones
Officer Justin Kline

Virginia State Police
Trooper Scott A. Lam

Just before midnight on February 26, 2017, Harrisonburg Police Officer Joshua Joseph observed an oncoming vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed — 53 MPH in a 35 MPH zone. Officer Joseph turned on the vehicle and activated his blue lights as the suspect vehicle approached an intersection and illegally turned right against a red light. Officer Joseph followed the vehicle, which turned the wrong way down a one-way street. The suspect continued to drive erratically, disregarding red lights and stop signs through the downtown business district.  Officer Joseph then turned his blue lights off and attempted to simply follow the suspect vehicle as he had recorded the vehicle’s registration. Officer Joseph eventually lost track of the suspect vehicle and resumed his regular patrol assignment.

About 30 minutes later, Officer Joseph observed a dark-colored truck that he believed was the same vehicle that he had attempted to stop earlier. Officer Joseph did not activate his blue lights until he could confirm from the registration that it was the same vehicle.  He notified the Emergency Communications Center that he was following the suspect vehicle and requested other units before he would initiate a traffic stop to avoid another possibility of a vehicle pursuit. 

Officer Justin Kline was in the area when Officer Joseph’s request for assistance came over the radio. As Kline approached, he observed Officer Joseph behind the suspect vehicle and turned around. Knowing the suspect vehicle had fled before, Officer Kline positioned his patrol vehicle at an angle to the suspect vehicle to prevent it from backing up to strike an officer or patrol vehicle. By this time, Officer Dwayne Jones had arrived to assist. 

Officer Kline exited his patrol vehicle and observed the suspect exit his vehicle with a small black revolver in his hand. The suspect immediately began to fire at Officer Kline, shattering the windshield of his patrol vehicle. A second round hit the spotlight on his vehicle.

The suspect then turned his weapon toward Officer Joseph, firing several rounds.  Officer Joseph proceeded to a nearby tree for cover as the suspect was firing on him. Officer Jones observed the suspect exit his vehicle and fire two shots at Officer Kline. Officer Jones and the suspect exchanged gunfire as Officer Kline was getting off the ground to pursue the suspect. Officer Jones and Officer Joseph then joined Kline in the foot pursuit.

Virginia State Police Trooper Scott Lam had been monitoring HPD’s radio traffic and immediately responded to assist the Harrisonburg officers with the stop. On arrival, Trooper Lam observed the suspect firing at the officers and, without hesitation, joined them in the foot pursuit.

The officers and Trooper Lam chased the suspect into the residential area and observed him turn a corner behind a residence and then either fall or jump into a boat on the ground. The officers repeatedly commanded the suspect to drop his weapon, which he had trained on the officers from his position inside the boat. Officer Jones again returned fire at the suspect.

Officers Joseph, Kline and Jones and Trooper Lam again took cover to assess the situation. Realizing the suspect was in the process of reloading his revolver, Trooper Lam used the distraction to his advantage and stealthily advanced on the suspect. Within seconds, Lam had disarmed the man and apprehended him.

With the suspect in custody, Trooper Lam assessed the well-being and safety of the Harrisonburg officers before rendering first aid to the injured suspect until EMS arrived on scene. The suspect was transported to UVA Medical and treated for the four gunshot wounds he sustained.

The investigation revealed the suspect had told members of his family that he was looking for a weapon so he could have a, “shootout” with law enforcement. The suspect is presently being held on numerous charges, including the attempted murder of four police officers.

For their acts of bravery in the line of fire, we award Harrisonburg Police Officers Joshua Joseph, Dwayne Jones and Justin Kline and Virginia State Police Trooper Scott Lam with the VACP Award for Valor.

 

Hopewell Police Department
Detective Cameron List

On March 20, 2016, Hopewell Police Officer Cameron List responded to a stabbing in progress call at Twin Rivers Apartments. His quick arrival interrupted the knife attack on an already seriously wounded victim.

Officer List was immediately confronted by the highly agitated offender who advanced towards him yielding three knives and was yelling for the officer to shoot him. Officer List gave several verbal commands for the suspect to drop the knives while trying to keep distance between the rapidly approaching offender and himself.

Unfortunately, the commands were unsuccessful and the assailant rushed Officer List, who was forced to discharge his weapon, killing the offender. First aid was immediately given to the mortally wounded offender as well as to the victim of the knife assault.

Both the offender’s daughter and the mother of the stabbing victim stated that, had Officer List not arrived and taken action when he did, the victim would have been killed in the stabbing attack. Both women called Officer List a “hero” and came to the Police Department to thank him personally.

For his extraordinary heroism and for putting his own life in imminent danger to save another, Hopewell Police Detective Cameron List is recognized with the VACP Award for Valor.

 

Newport News Police Department 
Sergeant Brendan D. Bartley
Master Police Officer Jamie A. Acree

On January 14, 2016 at approximately 11 am, Newport News police units were dispatched in reference to a vehicle crash. As officers responded, dispatch advised that there was a subject at the crash scene with a gun and that shots had been fired.

When the first officers arrived on scene, they observed two subjects had been shot and killed inside one of the vehicles. The officers were approached by a subject that had been in the vehicle, but was not injured, who pointed out the fleeing suspect that had committed the shooting. The first officer on scene radioed what the suspect was wearing and his direction of travel and requested officers respond to the area where he was headed.

Sergeant Brendan Bartley and Master Police Officer Jamie Acree arrived in the area and were setting up a perimeter when Sergeant Bartley radioed that he observed the suspect in the 1300 block of Roanoke Avenue. Sergeant Bartley took position on the west side of a courtyard between a set of buildings and MPO Acree was on the east side. Sergeant Bartley then reported that shots were fired and the suspect was down.

It appeared the suspect had discharged his weapon into the door of an apartment in an attempt to gain entry. Sergeant Bartley discharged two rounds from his duty weapon and MPO Acree discharged one round at the suspect when they observed he had a weapon and was not following their commands. The suspect sustained non-life-threatening injuries.

Two weapons were recovered in the immediate area of the suspect. Later investigation connected the suspect’s weapon to the murdered individuals at the crash scene. If not for the immediate actions of Sergeant Bartley and MPO Acree, a dangerous criminal may not have been taken into custody for the violent murders of two individuals.

We are honored to recognize Sergeant Brendan Bartley and Master Police Officer Jamie Acree with the VACP Award for Valor.

 

Virginia State Police
Special Agent Travis W. Keeter
Trooper Jamell R. Johnson

On the afternoon of March 31, 2016, a total of 16 troopers, special agents and supervisors had reported to the Greyhound Bus Station in the City of Richmond to conduct field practical operations.

The actions of a 34-year-old restaurant patron had caught the eye of Virginia State Trooper Chad Dermyer. As the man exited the terminal’s bathroom, Trooper Dermyer casually approached the man and engaged in a brief conversation with him. Shortly into the conversation, the male subject turned slightly away from the trooper to conceal the Beretta 40-caliber handgun he pulled from his waistband.

Within seconds, the male subject turned around and began shooting Trooper Dermyer at close range. He also shot and wounded a 21-year-old New York woman and a 41-year-old North Carolina woman standing nearby in the terminal.

Trooper Jamell Johnson and then-Trooper Travis Keeter were the closest in proximity to Trooper Dermyer and to the shooter.  Refusing to take cover, Trooper Johnson and Trooper Keeter immediately engaged the shooter in order to neutralize the ongoing threat to their fellow troopers and the citizens inside the bus terminal. Both troopers fired on the suspect, and Trooper Keeter continued the firefight as the suspect retreated into the terminal’s restaurant. Trooper Keeter was then able to place the suspect in handcuffs as Trooper Johnson went to Trooper Dermyer’s aid.

The suspect’s actions that afternoon clearly presented a life and death situation for numerous individuals inside the terminal. The gunman not only had an extensive criminal record in the state of Illinois, which included numerous drug violations and violent crimes, but he also had 143 rounds of additional ammunition in his possession. There is no doubt additional lives were saved because of Trooper Johnson and Special Agent Keeter’s instantaneous actions. Both readily put their own safety at risk in order to protect Trooper Dermyer and every other individual — sworn and civilian — exposed to this deadly gunman.

The concerted actions demonstrated by Trooper Johnson and Special Agent Keeter went well above and beyond the call of duty. A supervisor, who reviewed surveillance footage from inside the terminal stated, “… Special Agent Keeter’s speed in reacting was truly remarkable. His instant response clearly caught the suspect off guard.” Despite best efforts by Trooper Johnson and Special Agent Keeter, Trooper Chad Dermyer’s wounds proved to be fatal. Trooper Jamell Johnson and Special Agent Travis Keeter displayed exceptional leadership, courage, and professionalism, putting their lives on the line to save others. The VACP is honored to present them with the distinguished Award for Valor.

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The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

PHOTO CAPTION: 2017 VACP Award for Valor Recipients — (front row, L to R) Officer Konrad Kaufman (formerly Chesapeake PD, currently Roanoke PD) & Officer Heather Bishop (Chesapeake PD); Officers Dwayne Jones, Justin Kline & Joshua Joseph, Harrisonburg Police Department; and Trooper Scott Lam, Virginia State Police.
(back row, L to R) Special Agent Travis Keeter & Trooper Jamell Johnson, Virginia State Police; MPO Jamie Acree & Sgt. Brendan Bartley, Newport News Police Department; and Detective Cameron List, Hopewell Police Department.

PHOTOGRAPHER; Erin Schrad, VACP

Additional photos of the award winners are available  at http://photos.vachiefs.org/VACP-Conferences/2017-VACP-Annual-Conference/

 

Contact: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512 • Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

For Immediate Release

Herring to Announce Major Policy Proposals for Heroin & Opioid Crisis Response at VACP Conference | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Herring to Announce Major Policy Proposals for Heroin & Opioid Crisis Response at VACP Conference

September 15, 2017 | VACP

News Image On Monday, Attorney General Mark R. Herring will announce major policy proposals for Virginia's response to the heroin and opioid crisis. While addressing chiefs of police at the VACP and Foundation 2017 Annual Conference, Attorney General Herring will outline new programs and initiatives for the Commonwealth's response to the opioid epidemic.

These new proposals will be incorporated into Attorney General Herring's multifaceted approach to the heroin and opioid epidemic that includes enforcement, education, prevention, and legislation to encourage reporting of overdoses in progress, expand the availability of naloxone, and expand access to the Prescription Monitoring Program. He has supported federal efforts to improve the availability of treatment and recovery resources, partnered with U.S. Attorney Dana Boente to create the Hampton Roads Heroin Working Group to develop holistic, community-driven solutions to the heroin and opioid crisis,  and made prescription drug disposal kits available across the Commonwealth.

When: Monday, September 18
               9:30 AM

Where: Wyndham Virginia Beach Oceanfront
               False Cape B and Cape Henry C
               5700 Atlantic Avenue
               Virginia Beach, VA 23451

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Lara Sisselman, OAG
(804) 786-1022 (office)
(804) 489-7951 (cell)
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Front Royal announces new Chief of Police | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Front Royal announces new Chief of Police

September 12, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image Today, the Town of Front Royal Town Manager, Joseph E. Waltz, has appointed Mr. Kerry L. “Kahle” Magalis, II, as Chief of Police for the Town of Front Royal. Chief Magalis has been a lifelong resident of Warren County and has resided with his family in the Town of Front Royal since 2003. He plans to assume his role as Chief of Police the first of October.

He is leaving the Warren County Sheriff’s office where he has served since 1998, most recently in the position of Major. “As a Department of Criminal Justice Certified Law Enforcement Officer and a graduate of the FBI National Academy. Mr. Magalis, will be a welcomed addition to our staff. He has an extensive background in law enforcement and has proven himself as an approachable and professional public servant,” stated Town Manager, Joseph E. Waltz. “Throughout the interview process Mr. Magalis has been found to be a clear communicator who understands the importance of community policing. Mr. Magalis brings leadership, respect, professionalism and dedication to the citizens of our community.

Source URL: https://royalexaminer.com/2017/09/11/new-chief-police/

Governor’s Task Force on Public Safety Preparedness & Response to Civil Unrest to Hold First Meeting | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Governor’s Task Force on Public Safety Preparedness & Response to Civil Unrest to Hold First Meeting

September 12, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image RICHMOND – The Task Force on Public Safety Preparedness and Response to Civil Unrest will hold its first meeting this afternoon, Tuesday, September 12, 2017 from 2-4pm in the Patrick Henry Building in Richmond, Virginia. The Task Force will be chaired by Brian Moran, Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security.

During today’s meeting, the Task Force will hear presentations from Dean Rodney Smolla, a First Amendment scholar and Professor of Law at Widener University, as well as a presentation from Chief of Police Jim Cervera of Virginia Beach about the City’s permitting process.

Established by Executive Order Number 68, the Task Force is designed to assess the events in Charlottesville on August 12 and identify ways to improve the Commonwealth’s preparedness and response capabilities should such events occur in the future. The Task Force will also develop model permitting processes to govern public demonstrations for the state and local government agencies.

The Membership of the Commission is as follows:

The Honorable Brian Moran, Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security
The Honorable Carlos Hopkins, Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs
The Honorable Noah Sullivan, Counsel to Governor McAuliffe
Curtis Brown, Deputy Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security
The Honorable Bryce Reeves, Senate of Virginia
The Honorable Scott Lingamfelter, Virginia House of Delegates
The Honorable La Bravia Jenkins, Commonwealth’s Attorney, City of Fredericksburg
Colonel Steven Flaherty, Superintendent, Virginia State Police
General Timothy Williams, Adjutant General of Virginia
Dr. Jeff Stern, State Coordinator, Virginia Department of Emergency Management
Dr. Marissa Levine, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Health
Fran Ecker, Director, Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services
Victoria Pearson, Deputy Attorney General of Virginia
Tonya Chapman, Chief of Police, City of Portsmouth
Melvin Carter, Fire Chief, City of Richmond
James Redick, Director of Emergency Preparedness & Response, City of Norfolk
David Hines, Sheriff, Hanover County
Chief David McCoy, President, Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators

Noah Simon, City Manager, City of Lexington
Charlie Kilpatrick, Commissioner, Virginia Department of Transportation
Bill Leighty, Former Chief of Staff for Governor Kaine
Steve Cover, Deputy City Manager, City of Virginia Beach
Virginia Association of Counties Representative

J. Sergeant Reynolds Police Department Re-accredited by Law Enforcement Commission | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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J. Sergeant Reynolds Police Department Re-accredited by Law Enforcement Commission

September 7, 2017 | VACP

The J. Sergeant Reynolds Community College Police Department has achieved re-accreditation by the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) for its commitment to law enforcement excellence and recent successful completion of the re-certification process for the Virginia Law Enforcement Accreditation Program.

Accreditation programs are designed to measure and confirm compliance of the participating agency with the professional standards in whatever discipline or profession they are involved. It is one of the only means by which students, our college community, and its leaders can be assured that the college meets or exceeds professional standards.

Reynolds’ Police Department has demonstrated their commitment to professionalism and a willingness to be measured by and compared to the best in the profession. Reynolds is the only Virginia Community College Police Department that has achieved the VLEPSC accreditation.

The Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) overview and benefits statement reads, in part, “Accreditation is a coveted award that symbolizes professionalism, excellence, and competence. Employees will take pride in their agency, knowing that it represents the very best in law enforcement.”

“I am honored to accept this recognition on behalf of the men and women of the Reynolds Police Department for their hard work and dedication in reaching this milestone,” said Chief Paul Ronca. “Our team is devoted to leading the way for other community college police departments to become part of VLEPSC and demonstrate a willingness to be measured by and compared to other law enforcement agencies.”

To obtain accreditation, a law enforcement agency must meet all applicable program standards, maintain their accreditation files on an on-going basis, and provide annual verifications of compliance as required by the Commission. On-site assessments by specially-trained program assessors assure consistency and full compliance of all accredited agencies.

“This process confirms that the Reynolds Police Department policies and practices are of the highest standard”, said Reynolds President Dr. Gary Rhodes. This recognition is an impartial validation of the professionalism and care to our students of police services we have at Reynolds Community College.”

Norfolk Cops and Barbers Ready to Give Free Back to School Haircuts and Encouragement | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Norfolk Cops and Barbers Ready to Give Free Back to School Haircuts and Encouragement

September 1, 2017 | Virginia News

Norfolk Police community outreach initiative, "Five-0 and Fades" is prepared for an epic giveback of 300 free haircuts to school age boys, 5-18 years old, Sunday, September 3, 2017, 11am-6pm, at the Southside STEM Academy, Campostella Road, Norfolk.

In addition to the free haircuts, there will be numerous opportunities for youth and their families to engage with Norfolk officers in a block party atmosphere of games, free food and fun activities, to include outdoor movies, K-9 and bomb robot demonstrations, and social services information. NFL free agent and Norfolk native, Mike Wyche, will share his story of overcoming obstacles of gun violence and drugs, and encourage youth for a successful school year.

Chief of Police, L.D. Boone, knows this type of outreach creates positive community synergy. “I’m grateful to be in such a unique position now, having lived as a kid with the challenges of hunger and homelessness…where a fresh haircut, a back pack or new sneakers were not available to me for the first day of school for many years. I understand giving back can change lives and elevate self-esteem. This Sunday, cops and barbers will touch hundreds of hearts with haircuts!”

The Five-0 and Fades outreach initiative was launched January 2017, with a "live" community barbershop forum, for discussions on difficult topics between officers and young men.
Several Norfolk barbershops serve as the backdrop for the conversations that will assist to bridge the gap for mutual respect.

Youth must be accompanied by an adult to receive a haircut.

For more information, contact Karen Parker-Chesson, Norfolk Police Community Relations Manager at (757) 390-1954

Virginia State Police Announce Historic Change to Trooper Hiring Process | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia State Police Announce Historic Change to Trooper Hiring Process

September 1, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image VSP Now Hiring for Accelerated Lateral Entry Academy Program

RICHMOND, Va. – As of Sept. 1, 2017, the Virginia State Police is opening its Academy to current Virginia law enforcement interested in attending a new Accelerated Lateral Entry Program (ALEP). This is a first in the Department’s 85-year history to offer an abbreviated State Police Academy for existing Virginia Department of Criminal Justice (DCJS) certified law enforcement officers. Until now, any applicant for state trooper had to complete the full, six-month State Police Academy.

“Virginia State Police has not been immune to today’s challenging environment of having to compete with other law enforcement agencies to attract qualified candidates to join its sworn ranks,” said Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “Despite the salary increases provided by the Virginia General Assembly this year, State Police continues to struggle to prevent our sworn personnel from leaving for other agencies and then to fill those growing vacancies in a timely manner. Many of our field divisions across the Commonwealth are currently experiencing vacancy rates of nearly 50 percent.”

Offering an accelerated lateral program has gained in popularity among other state police and highway patrol agencies, as well as many local Virginia police agencies, as an effective method for increasing recruitment of qualified personnel. Virginia State Police are accepting applications for its ALEP as of Sept. 1, 2017, with the Academy class scheduled to begin in April 2018. Training will be an intense eight-week program designed to indoctrinate candidates into the State Police culture and instill its standards of integrity, professionalism, self-discipline, pride, valor and excellence in service. Candidates are paid while attending the ALEP Academy.

Those selected to participate in the State Police ALEP will be hired to a specific vacancy in a particular jurisdiction within the Commonwealth. Qualified candidates accepted to the State Police ALEP will be compensated at a beginning salary of $48,719. In accordance with the established Northern Virginia pay scale, applicants hired to a trooper vacancy in Northern Virginia will be compensated at a beginning salary of $60,587. Upon graduation, candidates are supplied all uniforms and equipment, including a take home car.

Among the qualifications for the ALEP, candidates must be currently employed by a Virginia law enforcement organization, have at least three years of DCJS-certified law enforcement experience, and be a VCIN Level C Operator. As is standard for all sworn applicants, ALEP candidates will undergo an extensive background investigation, to include a polygraph examination.

For additional information on all qualifications, restrictions, height/weight requirements, etc., for the Virginia State Police Accelerated Lateral Entry Program, please go to www.vsp.virginia.gov.

Danville police chief announces retirement plans | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Danville police chief announces retirement plans

August 31, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image Danville Police Chief Philip Broadfoot announced today that he will retire on Jan. 1, ending a 44-year career in law enforcement that included 13 years as chief of police in Waynesboro and 14 years as chief of police in Danville.

In Danville, Broadfoot leads a department with 238 employees in three divisions, with 153 (131 sworn) in law enforcement, 36 (34 sworn) in adult detention and 49 in juvenile detention.

“I am proud to have served for more than 44 years as a law enforcement officer, and it has been an honor and privilege to serve as chief of police in two great cities and to work with so many dedicated and professional officers and civilian employees,” Broadfoot said. “I ask that you continue to support these men and women as they endeavor to carry out their mission to protect and serve.”

Broadfoot said he has been planning for his retirement for a long time.

“When I started working at age 15, I accepted the fact I would be working until full retirement age (now 66),” Broadfoot said. “I never made any other plans.”

City Manager Ken Larking said Broadfoot told him last year that he was contemplating retirement and the timing of this announcement will allow Danville to conduct a comprehensive search for the best possible person to be the next police chief.

"Danville has been fortunate to have Chief Broadfoot lead our Police Department for the past several years," Larking said. "The importance he places on integrity and professionalism within the department has served this community well and will pay dividends for years to come."

Broadfoot began his career in law enforcement in 1973 as a patrol officer with the Waynesboro Police Department. He served in every division, including SWAT team commander, and was promoted through the ranks. He obtained his master’s in public administration in 1986 and in 1990 was named chief of police, leading a staff of 67 employees.

In March 2003, he joined the City of Danville as chief of police. During his tenure, he has championed and expanded efforts to leverage data and technology to increase productivity, transparency and accountability and build trust with the community. In July 2016, he was invited to the White House to deliver a presentation to other chiefs on the benefits of open data. The presentation was part of the President’s initiative on “Advancing 21st Century Policing.”

Mayor John Gilstrap said these efforts serve as a model for policing today.

“We live in a time that is increasingly challenging for law enforcement across the nation,” Gilstrap said. “We cannot thank Chief Broadfoot enough for the strong partnerships and strategic programs he has in place.”

During Broadfoot’s tenure as chief of police in Danville, the department also has seen reductions, adjusted for population, of 11 percent in overall crime and 27 percent in major crime.

Broadfoot credited the decrease in major crime to the application of community policing strategies, especially problem oriented policing.

Broadfoot said the challenges for the next police chief will be staffing vacancies and stemming the recent growth of violent gang crime. He said the Comprehensive Gang Model program the city is currently pursuing is the best strategy to address the issue.

He has served as parliamentarian for the board of directors and on multiple committees for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, presided as president of regional and state chief of police associations, oversaw construction of a 1,700-member police academy, and served as a community college and police academy instructor. He also has authored numerous articles and presented at various law enforcement conferences.

Broadfoot’s immediate plans after turning in his badge are to continue to remain engaged with family and volunteer activities.

VACP Statement to the State Crime Commission on Decriminalization and/or Legalization of Marijuana | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Statement to the State Crime Commission on Decriminalization and/or Legalization of Marijuana

August 30, 2017 | VACP

News Image The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police has been closely monitoring the public debate regarding the decriminalization or legalization of marijuana for the past several years. In the final analysis, the Association has determined that it must oppose these initiatives. Below are summaries for a number of our points in reference to this position.

Science confirms the harmful effects that marijuana has on an individual’s health. Decriminalization poses a direct threat to the well-being of our citizens. Eerily the same arguments espoused in favor of decriminalization or legalization are almost indistinguishable from those that tobacco companies offered in the 1960s when they claimed that smoking tobacco was not addictive and not a public health concern.

Marijuana proponents have repeated their strategy in Virginia of utilizing incremental steps in their quest to legalize it. The process begins with lobbying for its approval for medical purposes and then quickly advances to the decriminalization of “small amounts” of the drug. Once these benchmarks are reached, the public campaign and push for complete legalization is initiated. The Commonwealth already has entered the path toward this end by previously approving the medical marijuana model. We should not take another step down this road.

The abundance of prescription pills in medicine cabinets fuels the current opioid epidemic throughout this Commonwealth. One of the challenges in fighting this epidemic is that teenagers view these pills as being safe because their use is legal and prescribed by a physician. If marijuana is decriminalized or legalized, parents will face the same challenges represented by alcohol, cigarettes, and prescription medications in trying to stop their children from using these commodities. Thus, it follows that children also will view the use of marijuana as legitimate and safe during a period in their lives when they are the most vulnerable and the effects of its ingestion the most dramatic.

The marijuana black market has continued to flourish in those states where it is legal due to its substantially lower cost. Furthermore, the marijuana producers in those states have helped to extend the black market into states where it is still illegal by clandestinely shipping their product into those localities.

There is a process in this country for testing the benefits and consequences of individual drugs. Currently, the Federal Drug Administration has not approved the use of marijuana for medical treatment. The circumvention of this protocol for political expediency is an unsound public policy.

The government should not be considering profiting from the sale of marijuana, via assessing taxes on it, as a reason for its legalization. Information from states such as Colorado indicate that the revenue realized through legalization has not provided the expected financial windfall due to the costs associated with the issues that resulted from it as well as the unintended consequences of the drug’s use. It is our hope that our society has not become so morally bankrupt that we resort to allowing substances to be consumed that we know are harmful to our citizens in order for the government to realize tax revenues or for politicians to garner votes.

Virginia needs to remain “open for business” by providing employers with an employment pool of human resources that are less likely to be under the influence of marijuana upon returning to the workplace. This drug free workplace requirement is especially necessary in the law enforcement profession.

Every day, law enforcement professionals in this Commonwealth encounter abused or neglected children in circumstances that are the direct result of their caregivers’ drug addictions. The evidence is conclusive that the use of marijuana increases in areas where it is legal. The use of marijuana long has been recognized as a social gateway to more serious drug use and abuse. The resulting addictions affect an individual’s ability to function and to provide for their families. The consequences associated with their failures due to their addictions extends to the lives of their children, creating a continuing generational cycle of abuse.

Marijuana proponents state that their support for decriminalizing or legalizing this substance does not include allowing juveniles to use the drug. However, in states where marijuana possession is no longer a crime, marijuana suppliers are marketing edible marijuana in the form of lollipops, gummy bears, and other candies of this type. Honestly, how many adults consume these types of confectionaries? The only reasonable purpose in packaging marijuana as candies in this fashion is to introduce children to marijuana in order to procure their eventual support for the total legalization cause in the future.

When considering all of the costs associated with alcoholic beverage consumption, does legalizing another substance that causes the same problems constitute a rational public policy? Most people who drink alcohol do not generally do so to become intoxicated and can minimize their inebriation. However, when alcohol is consumed to excess, it is a major contributing factor in domestic violence, sexual assault and traffic crashes. Conversely, virtually everyone who uses marijuana does so with the intent to get high. Thus, we expect that the volume, severity, and cost of tragedies associated with marijuana doping are certain to increase with the decriminalization or legalization of marijuana. Therefore, our association urges the leadership of our great Commonwealth to do what is right and what is in the best interest of the personal health of our citizens by rejecting either decriminalization or legalization of marijuana.

On behalf of the Executive Board of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police,


Colonel Thierry G. Dupuis
VACP President, 2016-17

Germanna Becomes First VCCS State Certified Crime Prevention Campus | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Germanna Becomes First VCCS State Certified Crime Prevention Campus

August 30, 2017 | Virginia News

Germanna received the honor of being the first college within the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) to become a State Certified Crime Prevention Campus. Germanna is also one of only five Institutions of Higher Education of any kind in the state to be so honored since the award's inception in 2014.

The certification approval comes from the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Criminal Justice Services Board by way of recommendation from the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) Crime Prevention Center. GCC Police Chief Craig Branch accepted the honors along with other college police staff, college president Dr. Janet Gullickson, and DCJS Center for School and Campus Safety’s Coordinator for Campus Safety and Violence Prevention, Marc Dawkins at the August 25th Germanna College Council meeting.

To be certified, a college or university must detail crime prevention goals, programs and accomplishments. A certified crime prevention campus must have 11 core safety elements and four electives; these include having a certified crime prevention specialist on staff, maintaining mutual aid agreements with other agencies, continuing compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Act, having a crisis management plan in place and providing community based campus safety information/programs. Participant colleges/universities must undergo a rigorous application process and provide proof of overall community involvement and of meeting the mandated and optional elements. The college/university communities are then closely examined by a sub-committee of the Virginia Criminal Justice Services Board (CJSB) to ensure that they meet all required elements and have proven their commitment to the safety of the community.

Germanna will retain the crime prevention campus certification for three years before the college police department must complete a reassessment process to maintain certification, including assignment of additional Virginia certified crime prevention specialists.

VACP Response to Statement by Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Response to Statement by Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe

August 14, 2017 | VACP

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police stands ready to support Governor McAuliffe’s efforts to ensure that the Commonwealth ensures the rights of individuals to protest peacefully while providing for the safety of the public.

We welcome the opportunity to participate in any review of the recent events in Charlottesville to determine how Virginia law enforcement can be best prepared to respond to all potential conflicts.

We are grieving the loss of two outstanding public servants, Virginia State Police Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, who were killed in a VSP helicopter crash on Saturday.

Virginia law enforcement will honor them by continuing to strive for excellence in serving the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia.


Colonel Thierry G. Dupuis
President
Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police

Funeral Arrangements Finalized for Virginia State Police Pilots | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Funeral Arrangements Finalized for Virginia State Police Pilots

August 12, 2017 | VACP

News Image The VACP recommends that Va. law enforcement officers shroud their badges in honor of Virginia State Police Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M. M. Bates through the day of the last funeral — SATURDAY, AUGUST 19.

Our sincerest condolences to the friends and family of the Virginia State Police.

 

RICHMOND, Va. – Funeral arrangements have been finalized for Virginia State Police Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, who died in a helicopter crash in Albemarle County on the afternoon of August 12, 2017:

TROOPER-PILOT BERKE M.M. BATES

Visitation
Thursday, August 17, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Nelson Funeral Home at 4650 South Laburnum Avenue, Richmond, VA 23231

Funeral
Friday, August 18, 2017
11:00 a.m.
Saint Paul’s Baptist Church at 4247 Creighton Road, Richmond, VA 23223

The interment will be a private graveside service.

LIEUTENANT H. JAY CULLEN

Visitation
Friday, August 18, 2017
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Bennett Funeral Home at 14301 Ashbrook Parkway, Chesterfield, VA 23832

Funeral
Saturday, August 19, 2017
10:00 a.m.
Southside Church of the Nazarene at 6851 Courthouse Road, Chesterfield, VA 23832

The interment will be a private graveside service.

DONATIONS

For those wishing to support the Cullen and/or Bates families financially, contributions are being accepted through the Virginia State Police Association (VSPA) Emergency Relief Fund (ERF). Monetary donations can be made by check (made payable to VSPA-ERF with “Jay Cullen” and/or “Berke Bates” noted in the memo) or individuals may also donate through PayPal by visiting  http://vspa.org/initiatives/emergency-relief-fund.  When donating through PayPal please be sure to note the donation is for "Lt. Cullen and/or Tpr. Bates" in the comment section. Checks can be mailed to the VSPA ERF at 6944 Forest Hill Avenue, Richmond, VA 23225. All donations to the VSPA-ERF are tax deductible, and 100% of the donation goes to the families. For any additional questions, please contact the VSPA at 804-320-6272.

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MEDIA NOTE:

  • Visitations – NO MEDIA are permitted to attend/cover the visitations. We appreciate your cooperation and respect of both families’ wishes.
  • Funeral Services – Media WILL be allowed to cover the funeral services on Friday and Saturday. Additional details to come on parking, staging, etc.

Neither family wants to be approached by any media and we ask that you respect their privacy.


VIRGINIA STATE POLICE MOURNS DEATH OF TWO PILOTS

Lt. Jay Cullen, Virginia State Police
Lt. H. Jay Cullen

Trooper-Pilot Berke Bates, Virginia State Police
Trooper-Pilot Berke M. M. Bates

RICHMOND, Va. – The Virginia State Police is mourning the loss of its 64th and 65th members to die in the line of duty since 1932. Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen, 48, and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, 40, died last Saturday (Aug. 12, 2017) when the helicopter they were piloting crashed in Albemarle County. Funeral arrangements for both are still pending at this time.

Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen (1969 – 2017)
Lieutenant Cullen was born in Winchester County, N.Y., and graduated from Germantown High School in Memphis, Tenn., in 1987. Prior to joining the Virginia State Police in 1993, he worked as a flight instructor in Front Royal, Va. and Winchester, Va. He held a bachelor’s degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

He graduated from the Virginia State Police Training Academy as a member of the 90th Basic Session on May 13, 1994. His first patrol assignment upon graduation was in Virginia State Police Fairfax Division’s Area 9 Office in Fairfax. In 1999, he joined the Aviation Unit as a Trooper-Pilot at the Virginia State Police Aviation Base in Manassas and has been assigned to Aviation Unit ever since.

The following year he was transferred to the Lynchburg Aviation Base, where in 2003 he achieved the rank of Senior Trooper. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant in 2005 and assumed his new role at the Virginia State Police Aviation Base in Chesterfield County.

In 2007, he was named acting First Sergeant at the Chesterfield base. He was promoted to the rank of First Sergeant in 2012 and then became acting Lieutenant at the base that December.

He is a 2014 graduate of the National Criminal Justice Command College at the University of Virginia. In February 2017, he attained the rank of Lieutenant and became commander of the Aviation Unit.

Lt. Cullen is survived by his wife and two sons, ages 17 and 15.

Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates (1976 – 2017)   
Trooper-Pilot Bates was born in Manassas, Va. and graduated from Brentsville District Middle-Senior High School in Nokesville, Va. in 1994. He served as a Trooper with the Florida Highway Patrol from 1998 until he joined the Virginia State Police in 2004. He graduated from the Virginia State Police Academy on August 27, 2004 as a member of the 107th Basic Session.

His first assignment was in Virginia State Police Richmond Division’s Area 8 Office, which encompasses the City of Richmond and Henrico County. Less than a year later he became a member of the office’s Motors Unit, serving as a motorcycle trooper until 2013. He joined the Governor’s protection detail, known as the State Police Executive Protective Unit, in October 2013 and served with the unit for three years before accepting promotion to Special Agent with the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Richmond Field Office General Investigations Section. In July 2017, he became a Trooper-Pilot with the Virginia State Police Aviation Unit.

Trooper Bates is survived by his wife and twin 12-year-old son and daughter.

Fatal Helicopter Crash in Albemarle County

At 4:51 p.m. on Saturday (Aug. 12, 2017), a Virginia State Police Bell 407 helicopter crashed into a wooded area near a residence on Old Farm Road in Albemarle County.  The helicopter was assisting public safety resources with the ongoing situation in Charlottesville.

The pilot, Lt. Cullen of Midlothian, Va., and Trooper-Pilot Bates of Quinton, Va., died at the scene.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the state police are investigating the cause of the fatal helicopter crash in Albemarle County. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is also investigating the incident.

For information about the crash investigation, contact Peter Knudson, Public Information Officer with the National Transportation Safety Board at (202) 631-6034.


GOVERNOR AND FIRST LADY MCAULIFFE STATEMENT ON FALLEN VIRGINIA STATE POLICE

RICHMOND – Governor Terry McAuliffe and First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe released the following statement on the deaths of Lieutenant H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, both of the Virginia State Police:

“We are deeply saddened by the loss of Jay and Berke, both of whom were our close friends and trusted members of our team. Jay has flown us across the commonwealth for more than three and a half years. Berke was devoted to our entire family as part of our Executive Protective Unit team for the past three years.

“This is a devastating loss for their families, the Virginia State Police, and the entire commonwealth. Our hearts go out to their wives and children, and we stand by to support them during this difficult time. These heroes were a part of our family and we are simply heartbroken.”

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VACP Mourns Passing of Former Executive Director John Pearson | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Mourns Passing of Former Executive Director John Pearson

August 9, 2017 | VACP

News Image Today, we mourn the passing of a wonderful man — former VACP Executive Director Lt. Col. John Pearson. Following a 38-year career with the Virginia State Police — during which he served on the VACP Executive Board and ultimately as VACP President (1978-79), John guided the Association as its Executive Director for 6 years. A kind and humble man dedicated to Virginia law enforcement, he will be missed. Thank you for your service, John.

PEARSON, John Strother, 92, of Richmond, Va., passed away August 5, 2017. Born in Keysville, he was the son of the late William Lee and Mary Winslow Pearson.

Mr. Pearson was a graduate of Randolph-Henry High School, Charlotte Courthouse and the Traffic Institute of Northwestern University. He was preceded in death by his wife of 45 years, Nancy Ingle Pearson; and his granddaughter, Brandi Derr. He is survived by two daughters, Debbie Derr (Frank) and Beth Pearson; granddaughter, Beth Anne Derr; and great-granddaughter, Darrah Davis.

Mr. Pearson served for 38 years with the Virginia State Police, retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel. He then served six years as Executive Director of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police. During his retirement, he enjoyed his involvement with the Lions Club, the Eighth Air Force Historical Society and the 457th Bomb Group Association.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Heart Association or the American Diabetes Association.

The family will receive friends on Saturday, August 12, at 1 p.m., followed by a 2 p.m. service, at the Parham Chapel, Woody Funeral Home, 1771 N. Parham Rd., Richmond. Interment will follow in Westhampton Memorial Park.

VIEW ONLINE MEMORIAL

Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) Selects Richard Myers as Executive Director | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) Selects Richard Myers as Executive Director

August 8, 2017 | National News

News Image MCCA President and Montgomery County, MD Chief Tom Manger announced today that the Board of Directors has selected Richard W. Myers as the new MCCA Executive Director. Myers is currently the Chief in Newport News, VA.

Myers brings 40 years of experience in policing in six different states and 33 years as a police chief in six cities including Newport News, VA, Colorado Springs and Appleton, WI. He also served as interim chief in two cities including spending 11 months in Sanford, FL following the death of Trayvon Martin. He has been a member of the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies board since 2009 and was elected as Chair/President in 2015.

Myers will begin working with MCCA on September 18 and will assume the Executive Director role on November 1, 2017.

Newport News Police Chief Rick Myers Announces Resignation | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Newport News Police Chief Rick Myers Announces Resignation

August 8, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image Newport News Police Chief Rick Myers has announced plans to leave his position effective September 1, 2017. He has accepted a job with a national Police Chiefs organization as executive director. Myers has led the Newport News Police Department with a total of 424 sworn officers since January 2014.

“We have been fortunate to have Rick as our Chief of Police these past 3½ years,” City Manager Cindy Rohlf said. “With his extensive knowledge and experience in law enforcement, he has served the citizens of Newport News well during his tenure here.”

“It has been an honor and a privilege working with this Police Department, the City Manager, and City Council, as well as the citizens of this great city. This department truly exemplifies professionalism and community policing, and I am proud to have been a part of that,” Myers said. “This new opportunity is a natural and timely transition from being a chief while still being able to continue to serve my profession.”

An extensive national search will be conducted to fill the position of Police Chief. City Manager Rohlf has not named an Interim Chief of Police at this time.

Once an aspiring medical student, Williamsburg police chief finds passion in policing | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Once an aspiring medical student, Williamsburg police chief finds passion in policing

August 8, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image One summer night back in the late 1990s while responding to a call regarding a disorderly crowd in Portsmouth, Sean Dunn, then a patrol officer with the Portsmouth Police Department, had left the windows of his police cruiser ajar.

When he returned to the vehicle, he noticed that someone had anonymously slid a Bible through the window crack, which landed on the front passenger seat.

More than two decades later, Dunn, who took the helm in June as police chief for the Williamsburg Police Department, still has that Bible, a reminder of why he decided to become a police officer and the sacrifices he makes on a daily basis to protect the communities he has served through the years.

“It was one of those moments where I knew someone was concerned for me and what I do, and was just looking out for me,” said Dunn. “I will always keep that Bible.”

It was never Dunn’s intention to enter law enforcement. Dunn, who grew up in Portsmouth, had initially planned to attend medical school. Then he met his wife, Stacy, while working as an orderly at Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center, and his life took a detour.

He applied for a position with the Portsmouth Police Department so he could help put his wife through school instead.

“I was looking for a fun, exciting, and rewarding career,” Dunn said. “Twenty-four years later, I find it still to be the case.” ...

Read the full story...

Virginia law enforcement invited to join ‘Safe Sleep VA Campaign’ to reduce child fatalities | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia law enforcement invited to join ‘Safe Sleep VA Campaign’ to reduce child fatalities

July 10, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image The Virginia Department of Social Services' Three Branch Team would like to extend an invitation to you to join Virginia's Safe Sleep VA Campaign by becoming a Baby Box Distribution Site. This campaign could dovetail with an agency's child passenger safety program.

Virginia was selected, through a competitive application process, for the 2016-2017 Three Branch Institute sponsored by the National Governor's Association, National Conference of State Legislatures and Casey Family Programs to focus on service coordination among the three branches of government. The focus of this Institute is Improving Child Safety and Reducing Child Fatalities. There are approximately 70 members of Virginia's team including state legislators, Judges, Virginia Department of Social Services, Local Department of Social Services, Office of the Executive Secretary of the Supreme Court, Department of Medical Assistance Services, Virginia Department of Health, Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and multiple community partners. Thus far, Virginia has successfully completed many of the goals of Virginia's robust work plan to improve child safety and reduce child fatalities; however, much work remains.

While significant progress has been made to ensure child safety, there remains a consistent crisis with sleep-related fatalities in Virginia. In 2016, there were 126 child fatalities reported to local departments of social services in Virginia, and 57 were associated with unsafe sleep. In April, Virginia's Three Branch Team enthusiastically voted to include a universal Safe Sleep Campaign across Virginia. The campaign, Safe Sleep VA, will include a consistent safe sleep message, marketing of the safe sleep message in multiple avenues, an interactive website sponsored by the Virginia Department of Health, as well as partnership with Baby Box Co. and Baby Box University to distribute Baby Boxes throughout the Commonwealth.

FAQs About Safe Sleep VA Baby Box Distribution Sites

If you are interested in becoming a Baby Box Distribution Site with the Safe Sleep VA Campaign, please review the attached information and contact Elizabeth Overall at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (804) 726-7684. If becoming a Distribution Site is not appropriate for your Agency at this time, but you would still like information on Safe Sleep VA please contact Elizabeth as well.

In order to become a Baby Box Distribution Site, you must have physical space to store the boxes and agree to provide a Baby Box to every family who provides a Baby Box University certificate of completion.

Thank you for your diligent efforts and commitment to ensuring the safety of Virginia's most vulnerable children.

Sincerely,

Carl E. Ayers
Director, Division of Family Services

New Martinsville police chief has decades of experience with department | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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New Martinsville police chief has decades of experience with department

June 22, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image Chief Eddie Cassady joined the Martinsville Police Department in 1985.

MARTINSVILLE, Va. (WSET) - Chief Sean Dunn announced his departure in early June. During his tenure, he cut violent crime by 59 percent and overall crime by 30 percent. City leaders believe that success can continue with Dunn's replacement, Chief Eddie Cassady.

"I came to work at the Martinsville Police Department in 1985," Cassady said. Monday was his first day as chief of police.

He knows the system well. Cassady came in as a patrol officer, worked in the street crimes unit, as a detective, lieutenant, and captain in various departments.

He's been with the department for many many years, has risen through the ranks, knows the department inside and out," city manager Leon Towarnicki explained.

"One thing I've said about police work is that it's an ever changing, ever learning experience," Cassady said.

A constant in Cassady's career that he would like to continue to grow is community policing.

"Working with our community, they're our biggest asset."

It may only be day one of many, but Cassady told ABC 13 that he wants to get a quick start and continue initiatives started by Dunn, like making Martinsville a certified "Crime Prevention Community."

"It really boils down to working with the community, finding out what the real problems are, and addressing those issues within the community and getting that community input."

He also is looking at tackling the opiod problem in the area.

Cassady has always lived in this area, which he and city leaders think will help in his new role.

City leaders expect the transition to go smoothly.

Source URL: http://wset.com/news/local/new-martinsville-police-chief-has-decades-of-experience-with-department

Williamsburg selects Sean Dunn as new police chief | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Williamsburg selects Sean Dunn as new police chief

June 10, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (WAVY) — The Williamsburg Police Department has appointed Sean L. Dunn as chief of police, effective June 26. Dunn is the current chief of police in Martinsville, Virginia. He will succeed Williamsburg Police Chief Dave Sloggie, who retired at the end of December.

Dunn will receive an annual salary of $130,000.

Dunn has over 20 years of experience as a sworn police officer. He worked his way up the ranks from uniform patrol officer to commander (major) in the Portsmouth Police Department. His responsibilities included patrol operations, criminal investigations, crime analysis, crime prevention and community policing.

Dunn left Portsmouth police to become chief of police in Martinsville.

Chief Dunn has a master’s degree in organizational leadership from Regent University. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and the Police Executive Research Forum’s Senior Management Institute for Police.

“I am very excited to have the opportunity to serve the City of Williamsburg,” Dunn said. “Williamsburg is a world-class vacation destination and renown college town. I am committed to community policing and building strong relationships with our residents, students, the business community and visitors. I will be very involved to ensure we are delivering the highest service possible.”

The City used Developmental Associates, LLC to conduct a multi-step recruitment and assessment center process in order to screen and evaluate candidates for the selection of the new chief. The process began with the development of a ranking system that emphasized professional credentials, training and experience that corresponded with the characteristics sought by the community in the next chief. The two-day assessment center process put candidates through a series of group and individual exercises designed to simulate the conditions of the job and determines if the candidate has the skills and abilities necessary to perform the job — all while being observed by assessors from the community and law enforcement community.

“Beyond the exceptional training and experience demonstrated during the assessment center process that will benefit the dedicated officers and command staff of the Police Department”, said City Manager Marvin Collins, “Chief Dunn communicated a commitment to community policing and involvement that matches the community expectations for police leadership to build upon efforts to be responsive, progressive, and engaged with the diverse populations of Williamsburg.”

Source URL: http://wavy.com/2017/06/02/williamsburg-police-name-new-chief/

2016-17 VACP President Chesterfield Police Chief Thierry Dupuis to Retire September 1 | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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2016-17 VACP President Chesterfield Police Chief Thierry Dupuis to Retire September 1

June 6, 2017 | VACP

News Image CHESTERFIELD COUNTY, VA – Col. Thierry G. Dupuis, chief of police for Chesterfield County, announced today he will retire Sept. 1, having served the residents of Chesterfield County and the Richmond region for 40 years.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to have served our community and this region for the last 40 years as a law enforcement officer,” Col. Dupuis said. “I am leaving you with a police department that is among the finest in the nation. The men and women of this department serve the needs of this community with honor and compassion. I am very proud to have served with them and worn the uniform of a Chesterfield County Police Officer for so many years.”

During his tenure, Col. Dupuis’ focus has been on strengthening community-police partnerships and building a department that is responsive to the community’s needs. His commitment to educating the community and preventing criminal activity has helped spur the growth of the department’s Community Academy program and Chesterfield’s designation as a certified crime prevention community.  He also supported implementation of a Crisis Intervention Training program, which has helped Chesterfield County first responders be better prepared to serve people experiencing mental health crises.  Most recently, the police department earned accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies.  Renowned in the public safety profession, this accreditation demonstrates the department’s compliance with 189 CALEA standards.

“We have been very fortunate to have someone of Colonel Dupuis’ integrity as our chief of police,” said Dorothy Jaeckle, chair of the Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors and Bermuda District representative. “He has a very clear set of ethics that is reflected in the caliber of the personnel of our police department.  His qualities and leadership will be missed by Chesterfield and the region.”

Col. Dupuis was appointed chief of police for the Chesterfield County Police Department on July 10, 2007. He began his law enforcement career in 1977 as a deputy with the Richmond City Sergeant’s Office, which is now known as the Richmond City Sheriff's Office. He served as a patrol officer with the Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department in 1978, and then joined the Chesterfield County Police Department as a patrol officer in 1979. Col. Dupuis has served in all the department’s major divisions, and he is the first Chesterfield County Police chief to have held all ranks within the department, including officer, sergeant, lieutenant, captain, major and lieutenant colonel.

“Professionalism and ethics, two traits we look for in new officers, are ingrained within Chief Dupuis. His greatest legacy is the renowned department he built upon those traits,” said Dr. Joseph P. Casey, county administrator.

The recruitment process for Dupuis’ replacement is planned to be announced by the Board of Supervisors at its upcoming June 28 meeting.

Funeral Arrangements Finalized for Virginia State Police Special Agent Michael T. Walter | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Funeral Arrangements Finalized for Virginia State Police Special Agent Michael T. Walter

May 27, 2017 | VACP

News Image The VACP recommends that Virginia law enforcement officers shroud their badges in honor of Virginia State Police Special Agent Michael T. Walter though the day of his funeral — Saturday, June 3.

Our sincerest condolences to Agent Walter's family and friends and to the Virginia State Police.

 

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS

RICHMOND, Va. – Funeral arrangements have been finalized for Virginia State Police Special Agent Michael T. Walter, who was shot and killed in the line of duty Friday (May 26, 2017) in the City of Richmond:

VISITATION
Saturday, June 3, 2017
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Powhatan High School - 1800 Judes Ferry Road, Powhatan, Va. 23139

FUNERAL
Saturday, June 3, 2017
1:00 p.m.
Powhatan High School - 1800 Judes Ferry Road, Powhatan, Va. 23139

A reception will be held at Powhatan High School, for all those in attendance, immediately following the service.

The interment will be a private graveside service.

MEDIA NOTE:
Media access/coverage of the service has not been finalized at this time. VSP will follow up later Tuesday regarding these logistics. The Walter family does not want to be approached by any media and we ask that you respect their privacy.

DONATIONS
For those wishing to support the Walter family financially, contributions are being accepted through the Virginia State Police Association (www.vspa.org) Emergency Relief Fund (ERF). Monetary donations can be made by check (made payable to VSPA-ERF with “Mike Walter” noted in the memo) or through the VSPA PayPal account. Checks can be mailed to the VSPA ERF at 6944 Forest Hill Avenue, Richmond, VA 23225. All donations to the VSPA-ERF are tax deductible and SA Walter’s family will receive 100% of all contributions.


VIRGINIA STATE POLICE MOURNS DEATH OF BCI SPECIAL AGENT

RICHMOND – The Virginia State Police is mourning the loss of its 63rd member to die in the line of duty since 1932. Special Agent Michael T. Walter, 45, succumbed to his injuries shortly after 5 a.m. Saturday (May 27, 2017) at VCU Medical Center in Richmond. Special Agent Walter, a Powhatan County resident, is survived by his wife, Jaime, and two sons and a daughter, ages 14, 9 and 6, respectively.

Special Agent Walter, 45, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., and graduated Schalick High School in Elmer, N.J. He was a decorated veteran during his service with the United States Marine Corps (USMC) from 1989 to 1994. Prior to joining the Virginia State Police in 1998, he also worked as a security officer at MCV Hospital and then served two years as an officer with the Virginia Division of Capitol Police.

He entered the Virginia State Police Academy in 1998 and graduated as a member of the 98th Basic Session in May 21, 1999. His first patrol assignment upon graduation was in the Virginia State Police Fairfax Division’s Area 48 Office in Springfield. As a Trooper, he then transferred to the Richmond Division’s Area 6 Office in Powhatan in 2005. A year later he joined the State Police Academy staff as an instructor with the Department’s Canine Unit. In 2010, he was promoted to the rank of Special Agent and has been assigned ever since to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Richmond Field Office Drug Enforcement Section.

“Mike is well-known not only for his passion for criminal justice, but also for his commitment and passion to bettering the lives of local youth,” said Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendent, at a Saturday morning press conference in Mosby Court. “Mike founded and ran a non-profit organization, the Powhatan Youth Wrestling and Community Development Corporation, through the Black Hawk gym. For him and Jamie, this wasn’t about making a profit. It was about making a difference for disadvantaged youth by mentoring them and fostering their talents through physical fitness and sportsmanship.”

Shooting Suspect Taken into Custody

A Richmond man is now in custody following an overnight search by local, state and federal law enforcement across the Metro-Richmond region. The State Police and U.S. Marshals apprehended Travis A. Ball, 27, of Richmond, Va., at a residence in Northumberland County shortly after 6 a.m. Saturday (May 27). He was taken into custody without further incident. Ball is being held without bond on the arrest warrants obtained for him Friday night (May 26) of one count of malicious wounding, use of a firearm in the commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Additional charges are pending.

Ball is charged with shooting Virginia State Police Special Agent Michael T. Walter. Special Agent Walter succumbed to his injuries shortly after 5 a.m. Saturday (May 26) at VCU Medical Center in Richmond, Va.

Special Agent Walter was riding with a City of Richmond Police Officer as part of the ongoing City-State Partnership between agencies. At approximately 7:25 p.m., the Richmond Police Officer and Special Agent Walter observed a silver Chevrolet Cobalt pull up to the curb in the 1900 block of Redd Street. The officer and special agent pulled in behind the Cobalt and walked up to the car to initiate a conversation as part of a consensual encounter. As the Richmond Police Officer was talking with the driver, Special Agent Walter approached the passenger side where Ball was seated. Within moments, a single shot rang out and Ball was running from the car on foot.

The Richmond Police Officer immediately called for medical assistance and ran to Special Agent Walter’s aid. The Richmond Officer was not injured in the shooting.

The driver of the car remained at the scene and was detained by Richmond Police.

A handgun was recovered at the scene near the Chevrolet Cobalt. The investigation by the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s (BCI) Culpeper Field Office remains ongoing at this time.

Special Agent Walter was assigned to the Virginia State Police BCI Richmond Field Office’s Drug Enforcement Section and routinely partnered with the Richmond Police Department on investigative and patrol operatives.

Immediately following the shooting, a perimeter was established within the neighborhood for the safety of residents, preservation of the crime scene and to search for Ball. For the next 11 hours, law enforcement personnel from the Virginia State Police, Richmond Police, Henrico County Police, Hanover County Sheriff’s Office, FBI, US Marshals Service, DEA and ATF conducted a widespread search effort throughout the Metro-Richmond region. Their investigative efforts and tips from the public ultimately led to Ball’s apprehension in the Northern Neck early Saturday morning.

VLEPSC Honors Hopewell Police Department for Achieving Re-Accreditation | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VLEPSC Honors Hopewell Police Department for Achieving Re-Accreditation

May 23, 2017 | VACP

News Image The City of Hopewell Police Department has achieved re-accreditation by the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) for its commitment to law enforcement excellence as evidenced by their successful completion of the re-certification process for the Virginia Law Enforcement Accreditation Program.

All accreditation programs are designed to measure and confirm compliance of the participating agency with the professional standards in whatever discipline or profession they are involved. It is one of the only means by which citizens and government leaders can be assured that an agency is maintaining the high performance marks to which the community has a right.

The Hopewell Police Department has demonstrated their commitment to professionalism and their willingness to be measured by and compared to the best in the profession.

The Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission (VLEPSC) overview and benefits statement reads, in part, “Accreditation is a coveted award that symbolizes professionalism, excellence, and competence. Employees will take pride in their agency, knowing that it represents the very best in law enforcement.” “I am honored to accept this recognition on behalf of the men and women of the Police Department for their hard work to reach our re- accreditation goal,” said Chief John Keohane. “Our team has demonstrated a clear devotion to their profession and a willingness to be measured by and compared to our law enforcement peers.”

To obtain accreditation, a law enforcement agency must meet all applicable program standards, maintain their accreditation files on an on-going basis, and provide annual verifications of compliance as required by the Commission. On-site assessments by specially trained program assessors assure consistency and full compliance of all accredited agencies.

“The State Accreditation process ensures that the Police Department policies are of the highest standard and that they are adhering to these policies, said City Manager Mark Haley. This recognition is independent confirmation of the professionalism and high quality of police services we have in the City of Hopewell.”

Mr. Derrick Mays, Department of Criminal Justice Services VLEPSC Program Manager will formally present the second Certification of Accreditation to the City of Hopewell Police Department at the May 23rd City Council meeting.

A listing of the VLEPSC program criteria is available on the DCJS website at www.dcjs.virginia.gov.

Virginia State Police Reminds Motorists to Slow Down or Move Over This Memorial Day Weekend | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia State Police Reminds Motorists to Slow Down or Move Over This Memorial Day Weekend

May 23, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image RICHMOND – Memorial Day signifies the official start of summer, and the Virginia State Police is taking this opportunity to remind motorists to do what’s right when they see lights – #MoveOver.

The “Move Over” law is a lifesaving law intended to protect public safety professionals and highway workers who help to maintain the safety of the Commonwealth’s roads.

Drivers are required to change to another travel lane or, when unable to change lanes, cautiously pass emergency personnel stopped on the side of the road. The law also includes highway maintenance vehicles and tow trucks equipped with flashing amber lights.

From 2006 to 2015 nationwide, 128 law enforcement officers were struck by vehicles while conducting traffic stops, assisting motorists, directing traffic, or otherwise working at the roadside.*

Last year, five Virginia State Police troopers were injured after being involved in crashes in which a motorist failed to “Move Over.” Nationwide, 15 officers were struck and killed outside their vehicles.**

“Every day first responders and highway workers knowingly take on the dangerous task of working along the roadside to assist motorists or improve our highways,” said Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “We’re asking drivers to help protect those men and women by doing what’s right when they see flashing red, blue or amber lights – Move Over or Slow Down. It’s the law, and it could save a life.”

(Click HERE to view/download a video of Colonel Flaherty speaking about the “Move Over” law. Use of the video or soundbites from it is welcome in news coverage.)

Since the 2017 Memorial Day holiday weekend falls within this year’s Click It or Ticket campaign, state police troopers will be even more vigilant in their efforts to increase seat belt usage among adults, teenagers and children. The two-week, concentrated educational and enforcement initiative began Monday and runs through June 4, 2017. The annual Click It or Ticket campaign combines high visibility enforcement of seat belt and child safety seat laws with outreach and education. 

Of the 761 total people killed last year in crashes throughout Virginia, 304 were unrestrained.***

Occupant restraint enforcement is a key component of the Operation C.A.R.E. (Combined Accident Reduction Effort) traffic safety initiative that begins 12:01 a.m. Friday, May 26, 2017, and concludes Monday, May 29, 2017, at midnight.

The state-sponsored, national program encourages law enforcement agencies to increase visibility and traffic enforcement efforts on major travel holidays, like Memorial Day. The program also means that all available Virginia State Police troopers will be on patrol through the holiday weekend.

The 2016 Memorial Day Operation C.A.R.E. initiative resulted in troopers citing 913 individuals who failed to obey the law and buckle up, as well as issuing 273 citations for child safety seat violations on Virginia’s highways statewide. In addition, state police cited 11,048 speeders and 2,663 reckless drivers. A total of 131 drunken drivers were taken off Virginia’s roadways and arrested by state troopers.

There were 11 traffic fatalities statewide during the five-day period (May 27, 2016 – May 31, 2016) of the 2016 Memorial Day weekend. In 2015, there were 14 traffic deaths and, in 2014, Virginia experienced eight fatalities on Virginia’s highways during the holiday weekend.***

*Source: FBI Uniform Crime Reports
**Source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
***Source: Virginia Highway Safety Office, Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles

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VACP Past President Colonel William L. Durrer passes away | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Past President Colonel William L. Durrer passes away

May 17, 2017 | VACP

News Image It is with sadness that we announce the passing of Col. William L. Durrer, retired Fairfax County Chief of Police. Col. Durrer was President of the VACP in 1969-1970.

Col. Durrer passed peacefully in Daleville, VA on May 15, 2017. He is survived by his wife of 71 years, Ayleen, and by loving family. His grandson, Paul Dooley, is a police officer in Fredericksburg.

Funeral Arrangements

An open memorial service will be held on Wednesday, May 24th, at the Messiah United Methodist Church, 6215 Rolling Rd, West Springfield, VA 22152.  (This is almost across the street from the West Springfield Governmental Center and District Station.)  Church doors will open at 10:00 AM, and the service will be from 10:30 to 11:30.  Following the service there will be a police motor escort from the church to a reception to be held at the Fairfax County Police Association Hall on Popes Head Rd.  

Inurnment (burial) will be on Thursday, the 25th, 11:00 AM, at Mount Comfort Cemetery on South Kings Hwy, in Groveton.  Anyone who would like to attend is welcome.

In lieu of flowers it is requested that donations be made in memory of Chief Durrer to:

'Fairfax County Police Honor Guard'  
3911 Woodburn Rd.
Annandale, VA 22003

Note: The family appreciates the outpouring of support.  It truly means a lot.

------------------------------------

In memory of
Colonel William L. Durrer (retired),
Chief of Police, Fairfax County

(Born 1924 • Died 2017)

Following in the footsteps of his father, William L. Durrer served Fairfax County as a law enforcement officer with pride, passion, and integrity for 28 years. A World War II Veteran, Chief Durrer joined the department in 1947. Ten years later, as Fairfax County’s population and economic development exploded, Major Durrer (the highest rank at the time) was appointed Chief of Police. At 35 years old, he was the youngest police chief in the region. With the county expanding so rapidly, Chief Durrer needed a new plan.

Although he later claimed he “didn’t have a plan” and “flew by the seat of his pants,” his history of achievements tells a different story. Too numerous to list, some accomplishments included:

  • the establishment of six sub-stations
  • met his goal of having one officer for every 1,000 residents
  • opened a new state-of-the-art headquarters and instituted innovative technology
  • formed a Community Relations Division and Police Cadet Program
  • formalized and structured the General Orders Manual to maintain consistency in operations and administration

After a lifetime of service to his nation and his county, Chief Durrer retired in January 1975. Sadly, William L. Durrer passed away on May 15, 2017, at his home with his wife, Ayleen, by his side; they had just celebrated their 71st wedding anniversary. He is survived by his wife and loving family. Bill, you will be forever missed but never forgotten.

VACP UPDATE: MAY 2017 | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP UPDATE: MAY 2017

May 1, 2017 | VACP

In This Update:


TUESDAY, 5/2! WEBINAR: “Feeling Sleepy? How Officer Fatigue Creates Individual and Agency Risk”

FREE, presented by Lexipol

Almost every law enforcement officer has dealt with fatigue caused by shift work and other job-related factors. It’s a serious problem — yet few agencies recognize the risks fatigue presents or are taking a proactive approach to addressing it. How many tragedies are assigned a proximate cause of “X,” when the root cause is actually fatigue? Rarely do we even ask the question, “How much sleep did the involved officer/deputy have in the last four days?”

Join Dr. Lois James, Dr. Stephen James and Gordon Graham for an illuminating presentation about the effects of sleep loss and shift work on law enforcement officers’ decision-making, critical thinking, coordination and balance, driving and more. We’ll also explore practical steps agencies and officers can take to minimize the effects of officer fatigue and reduce associated risks. You’ll learn:

  • What contributes to officers being overly fatigued.
  • The connection between officer fatigue and increased agency liability.
  • What actions can be taken against agencies and/or supervisors that allow officers to work when they are dangerously fatigued.
  • Steps innovative agencies are taking to combat officer fatigue.
  • How policy can and should support officer wellbeing and work to prevent overly fatigued officers from endangering themselves or others.

DATE/TIME
Tuesday, May 2, 1 pm ET/10 am PT

REGISTER
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/33491504398784257


National Police Week — May 15-21, 2017

In recognition of National Peace Officers' Memorial Day, the VACP recommends shrouding of badges on Monday, May 15 to honor all of the law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, as per the ODMP Mourning Band Protocol.

The Virginia State Police cordinally invite you to attend the 2017 VSP Memorial Service on Wednesday, May 10 at 10:30 am in the VSP Academy Gymnasium (7700 Midlothian Turnpike, Chesterfield County, Virginia, 23235). The service is in memory of TROOPER CHAD P. DERMYER and ALL the men and women of the Virginia State Police and law enforcement agencies across the nation who have given their lives in service to others.

On Friday, May 26 at 7:30 PM, the Virginia Beach Police Foundation is presenting the documentary film Fallen at the National Geographic 3D Theater located inside the Virginia Beach Aquarium and Marine Science Center. The documentary will provide a humanizing look at line-of-duty police deaths across the country, and how these losses affect those close to the fallen, as well as the communities they serve. To date, Fallen has only been screened at the Phoenix Film Festival, where it won the coveted “Audience Award.” In addition to the Virginia Beach date, the film will also screen in DC on May 15 – Peace Officers' Memorial Day.

Tickets for both the DC and Virginia Beach public showings are available for $12.50/each and may be purchased in advance online at http://www.fallenproject.com. (Advance purchases are recommended as seating is limited.)

NOTE: There is a special Law Enforcement Officer-only screening of Fallen scheduled for Thursday, May 25 in Virginia Beach. Tickets for this screening are FREE, but limited. Contact Lt. Scott Humphrey, VBPD, at Humphrey@ODMP.org for more information.


Nominations for 2017 VACP Awards Due June 5, 2017

Please take the time to nominate your deserving officers or citizens for the 2017 VACP Awards for Valor, Lifesaving and Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement. An officer or citizen's actions need only have occurred prior to the deadline to be eligible for nomination by a VACP member. (In other words, they are not limited to the 2016 calendar year.)

Valor and OCLE Awards are presented at the VACP Annual Conference in September. Lifesaving Awards are distributed to agency heads for presentation within the agency.

Click here for more information


Registration Open for VACP Golf Tournament

Please join us for a great day of golf on Monday, July 24, on the Woods Course at Kingsmill Resort! This tournament is being hosted by the James City County Police Department, Kingsmill Police Department, and the Williamsburg Police Department. Proceeds benefit the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation leadership education and law enforcement training programs.

Early Registrations (on or before July 1) are just $80/person. After July 1, it is $85/person. The registration fee covers greens fees for 18 holes of golf, cart, trophies for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners, prizes for the winners of the Longest Drive and Closest to the Pin contest, and awards dinner. Limited to 32 teams!

For more information about the tournament, lodging, or sponsorship, see the registration page at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/vacpf-captains-choice-golf-tournament-registration-32171989286


Professional Executive Leadership School (PELS) — 41st Session

Applications are now being accepted for the 41st Session of PELS being held September 11-15, October 16-20, & November 13-16, 2017 at the University of Richmond. The application deadline is June 15, 2017.


Book your room in the Del-Mar-Va hotel block for IACP 2017 in Philadelphia!

Once again, the VACP has arranged for a block of rooms for IACP conference attendees from Delaware, Maryland & Virginia. If interested in booking a room in the Del-Mar-Va block at the Hilton Philadelphia at Penn's Landing, see our IACP conference page for more information. The block is open until July 31.

Due to the close proximity of the IACP Conference to the 3 states, we expect the block to sell out, so make your reservations soon!


Featured Job Opportunities

Chief of Police Lexington, VA
Chief of Police Smithfield, VA
Police Lieutenant Bedford, VA
Public Information Specialist Herndon, VA

More Job Opportunities


Upcoming Trainings, Conferences & Events

May 2 WEBINAR: "Feeling Sleepy? How Officer Fatigue Creates Individual and Agency Risk" — 1pm ET
FREE, presented by Lexipol
May 10 2017 Virginia State Police Memorial Service
Chesterfield, VA
May 22 Missing Children: Dynamics & Response (MCDR)
Alexandria, VA
June 7-9 VACLEA Summer Conference 2017
Virginia Beach, VA
July 24 VACP Captain's Choice Golf Tournament
July 25-26 FBI Joint Terrorism Taskforce Conference
Richmond, VA
July 28 Missing Children: Dynamics & Response (MCDR)
Alexandria, VA
August 12-14 IACP 23rd Annual Conference on Drugs, Alcohol & Impaired Driving
National Harbor, MD
September 17-20 2017 VACP Annual Conference
Virginia Beach, VA
October 21-24 2017 IACP Annual Conference
Philadelphia, PA

 

“Fallen” Documentary to Premier in DC, Virginia Beach in May | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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“Fallen” Documentary to Premier in DC, Virginia Beach in May

April 25, 2017 | National News

News Image On Friday, May 26th at 7:30 PM, the Virginia Beach Police Foundation is presenting the documentary film Fallen at the National Geographic 3D Theater located inside the Virginia Beach Aquarium and Marine Science Center. The film will also screen in DC on May 15th – Police Memorial Day.

To date, Fallen has only been scheduled for screenings in Phoenix, Washington, D.C. and Virginia Beach. At the Phoenix Film Festival, Fallen won the coveted “Audience Award”.

The documentary will provide a humanizing look at line-of-duty police deaths across the country, and how these losses affect those close to the fallen, as well as the communities they serve. We believe this will be a tremendous opportunity for you to have an unprecedented look inside the police culture.

2016 saw a 56% increase in officers being shot and killed in the U.S. All sides want to interject politics into these numbers, but all of that aside, there are countless personal stories going untold beneath these tragic numbers. These fallen heroes deserve a voice, as do their families, loved ones and partners who are struggling to pick up the pieces these tragedies leave behind. Through the words of those who have lived alongside these tragedies, these stories will be told.

Not only will this film serve as an educational snapshot of history, but its raw honesty and intimately candid perspective will serve as a tribute to all those who have sacrificed everything so that we may enjoy the safety and freedoms we all take for granted.

The 7:30 PM screening on Friday, May 26 will be open to the public. (The 5:30 screening is invite-only.) Seating is limited so we encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance. Tickets are $12.50 and are now available at www.VBPoliceFoundation.org or www.FallenProject.com or directly at: www.eventbrite.com/e/screening-fallen-documentary-tickets-33407287095

NOTE: There is a special Law Enforcement Officer-only screening scheduled for Thursday, May 25 in Virginia Beach. Tickets for this screening are FREE. Contact Scott Humphrey at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

THEATRICAL TRAILER

Also available at http://www.fallenproject.com or on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/6rv0xfASL6M

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Culpeper Police accredited by CALEA for the fifth time | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Culpeper Police accredited by CALEA for the fifth time

April 7, 2017 | VACP

News Image The Culpeper Police Department earned its fifth advanced international accreditation certification from the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) following a panel interview by CALEA commissioners at CALEA's conference in Mobile, Alabama on March 25, 2017.

On Saturday, March 25, 2017, Culpeper Police Chief Chris R. Jenkins, Major Chief Settle, Lieutenant Lee Rees, and Lieutenant Jeff Dodson appeared before a four-member panel of commissioners to answer questions about the department and its operations. The commissioners reviewed the assessment report prepared in November by a two-member team of law enforcement professionals from outside of Virginia, who reviewed department compliance with specified standards, conducted ride-alongs with officers, interviewed citizens, and conducted a public hearing.

The panel comprised of Curtis Holt, who is the City Manager for Wyoming, Michigan. Chief Pete Kassetas, who is the Chief of Police for the New Mexico State Police. Douglas Knight, who is the Chief of Police (retired) with the Vandalia Police Department in Ohio. Mr. Marlon Lynch, who is the Vice President for Global Campus Safety at the New York University Department of Public Safety.

The 27-page assessment report, written by Captain Perry L. Twisdale of the Henderson Police Department in North Carolina following his team's visit concluded that the Culpeper Police Department "shows a top to bottom understanding of the accreditation process and has implemented it into their agency culture." Captain Twisdale also noted in his report that the police department "is very involved with the community and with the programs they offer."
CALEA is a voluntary international program that demonstrates a department's commitment to excellence, while serving its citizens and showing that the agency is meeting internationally established best practices for law enforcement agencies.

In a March 2017 letter congratulating the Culpeper Police Department on its reaccreditation CALEA chairperson Chief Richard W. Myers (Newport News Police Department) and CALEA Executive Director W. Craig Hartley Jr. indicated that CALEA accreditation is the "mark of professional excellence" and "gold standard" for the agency.

In order to achieve CALEA accreditation, the Culpeper Police Department is required to meet the tough 484 standards outlined by CALEA. The agency is required to establish written directives for these standards and show compliance with these written directives.

In Virginia there are 340 law enforcement agencies. Only 31 of these agencies are accredited with CALEA. Culpeper Police Department is the 3rd smallest law enforcement agency in Virginia with CALEA accreditation status.

"CALEA accreditation is truly the gold standard in public safety and a true testament to the hard work that the men and women of the agency do each day in our community." states Chief Chris Jenkins. "CALEA accreditation is a report card for our community from an outside agency showing that we are meeting internationally established best practices for law enforcement agencies. We are thankful to have such a supportive community who embraces the CALEA accreditation process. We will continue to evaluate the services that we provide to our citizens each day and strive to deliver the highest quality police service to our citizens that we can" according to Chief Jenkins.

CALEA Executive Director W. Craig Hartley Jr. will publicly present the CALEA advanced re-accreditation certification at the Town Council meeting on April 11, 2017 at 7:00pm.

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Contact: Lieutenant Jeff Dodson – (540) 212-8231
Photo attached: Chief Jenkins, Major Settle, Lieutenant Rees, and Lieutenant Dodson accepting the CALEA accreditation award in Mobile, Alabama on March 25, 2017 from Chief Richard W. Myers.

Funeral arrangements announced for Carroll County Deputy Curtis Allen Bartlett | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Funeral arrangements announced for Carroll County Deputy Curtis Allen Bartlett

March 10, 2017 | VACP

News Image The VACP recommends that Va. law enforcement officers shroud their badges in honor of Carroll County Sheriff's Deputy Curtis Allen Bartlett though the day of his funeral – Wednesday, March 15.

Our sincerest condolences to Deputy Bartlett's family and friends and to the Carroll County Sheriff's Office.

Funeral Arrangements

Arrangements for Deputy Bartlett are as follows:

Visitation
Tuesday, March 14, 2017 • 1400-2100 HRS (2:00 – 9:00 PM)

First Baptist Church
1024 E Stuart Drive
Galax, VA 24333

Funeral Services
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 • 1400 HRS (2:00 PM)

First Baptist Church
1024 E Stuart Drive
Galax, VA 24333

Any law enforcement agency that may have officers, honour guard, color guard, or any other special units planning to attend the services for Carroll County Deputy Curtis Allen Bartlett, please contact Trooper N. S. Rife at 276-733-5542.


The two news releases below are from Carroll County Sheriff John B. Gardner and from the Virginia State Police:

Statement from Sheriff John B. Gardner, Carroll County Sheriff’s Office:

It is with an extremely heavy heart that I must announce the death of Carroll County Sheriff’s Deputy Curtis Allen Bartlett. Deputy Bartlett, 32, did not survive the line-of-duty crash he was involved in late Thursday evening, March 9, 2017.

Curtis joined the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office in June 2013 and was highly respected by his peers for his dedication to duty and passion for public service. He had extensive experience in private security and served his country as an infantry soldier with the U.S. Army from November 2004 to July 2007. Prior to joining the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, Curtis also served a year as a patrol officer in Albemarle, N.C.

He earned instructor certifications through the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) for firearms, Taser, and fitness training. Curtis was a certified K9 handler through the US Department of Defense. He was a 2013 graduate of the New River Criminal Justice Training Academy in Dublin, Va., and a graduate of Galax High School.

Having become a CrossFit Level 1 Trainer, Curtis was recognized for his commitment to health, nutrition and fitness, and strived to motivate others within our Sheriff’s Office and other agencies to work towards healthier lifestyles. He was also an accomplished pilot and in 2013 was recognized by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for achieving FAA Airmen Certification.

He is survived by his parents, Sam and Linda Bartlett of Galax, Va, and four siblings.

I ask that everyone keep Deputy Bartlett’s family in their hearts and prayers during this most difficult of times. His loss is being felt by everyone within his “family” at the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, and our neighboring police agencies in Galax and Hillsville and the state police.

Funeral arrangements are pending at this time.

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VSP Press Release: VSP Investigating Fatal Crash in Carroll County

The Virginia State Police are on the scene of a crash involving a Carroll County Sheriff’s Deputy and a tractor-trailer. The crash occurred shortly after 10 p.m. Thursday (March 9) at the intersection of Route 58 and the Interstate 77 Exit 14 exit ramp in Carroll County.

A Carroll County Sheriff’s Deputy was responding to assist a fellow Sheriff’s Deputy and Virginia State Police trooper with an ongoing pursuit in Carroll County. The Sheriff’s Deputy was traveling west on Route 58 with emergency lights and sirens activated when it collided with a tractor-trailer making a left turn onto Route 58 from the Interstate 77 Exit 14 ramp. The tractor-trailer had the green light and was only traveling approximately 25 mph. The Deputy’s vehicle was unable to avoid the tractor-trailer and struck the rear tandem. The Sheriff’s Deputy died at the scene.

The Sheriff’s Deputy was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash.

The driver of the tractor-trailer, a 59-year-old male from Barren Springs, Va., was not injured in the crash.

The Virginia State Police Crash Reconstruction Team responded to the scene to assist with the ongoing investigation, which is being conducted by the Virginia State Police.

The pursuit was initiated by a Carroll County Sheriff’s Deputy at approximately 9:50 p.m., along Route 58 near I-77 Exit 14. The suspect vehicle went through a field and then the driver and passenger fled on foot. Within minutes both suspects were in custody – one was apprehended by the Carroll County Sheriff’s Deputy and the other taken into custody by a Virginia State Police Trooper assisting with the pursuit.

 

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Where Do We Go From Here? Considering Proactive Policing Through the Lens of Ethics & Policy | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Where Do We Go From Here? Considering Proactive Policing Through the Lens of Ethics & Policy

March 7, 2017 | National News

By Donald R. Weaver, Lexipol

The last few years have been a trying time for law enforcement. What some thought were isolated incidents of protests, ridicule and scorn now feels like the new normal across the country.

It is understandable that many in law enforcement are feeling discouraged by the onslaught of critical news headlines and what can feel like a growing anti-police sentiment. Physical threats have increased, including violent ambush attacks on law enforcement officers. This has caused some individual officers and administrators to reconsider their approach to proactive policing. A recent Pew Research Center report noted that 72% of officers have become less willing to stop and question people who seem suspicious.

Although it may seem that we are taking fire from all sides (literally and figuratively), there are many who do support us and, regardless, our communities count on law enforcement officers to continue their mission. While departments, shifts, squads and even individual officers may have different approaches and philosophies, any discussion surrounding the appropriate role of proactive policing should include a discussion about ethics and policy.

We could simply perform reactive tasks, such as responding to calls and performing specific assignments. We could avoid taking enforcement action based on observed suspicious or criminal behavior. De-policing is one term that has been used to describe this approach. Others have offered opinions about the so-called “Ferguson effect” and whether increased scrutiny has changed how we in law enforcement carry out our duties.

Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, also suggested that increased scrutiny from the courts would encourage officers to disengage:

“Delivering vague proclamations about do’s and don’ts runs the risk of incentivizing officers to take no action, and in doing so to leave individuals and their prospective victims to their unhappy fates. Law enforcement will learn soon enough that sins of omission are generally not actionable … And in the face of nebulae from the courts, the natural human reaction will be to desist. Perhaps this is what we mean to achieve, but over-deterrence carries its own risks, namely that those who badly need help will receive no help, and we shall be the poorer for it.” (Armstrong v. Pinehurst, 2016 WL 105386 (4th Cir. 2016), opinion of Circuit Judge Wilkinson, concurring in part)

Regardless of whether some people think that disengaging or ceasing proactive policing efforts is an acceptable (or even an inevitable) response, we are reminded by the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics that, “I know that I alone am responsible for my own standard of professional performance.” In other words, as professionals we are responsible and accountable for our own decisions and actions and should not give ourselves a pass just because others might think disengaging is OK.

We should apply the ethics of our profession as we consider the appropriate role that proactive policing should play in our overall law enforcement strategy. We may not be able to fully honor those ethical cannons with reactive policing efforts alone. Consider how the following excerpts from the Code of Ethics might apply to this discussion:

“As a law enforcement officer, my fundamental duty is … to safeguard lives and property.”
Not taking proper enforcement action when observing suspicious or illegal activity diminishes our ability to safeguard lives and property. Discouraging those around us from taking proper enforcement action likewise diminishes our ability to safeguard lives and property. If we simply respond to take crime reports after the fact, we are not safeguarding lives and property as effectively as we could. We would be missing opportunities to identify criminals, uncover criminal activity and even prevent some crimes.

“I will maintain courageous calm in the face of … scorn or ridicule.”
While we should take every opportunity to examine and continuously improve how we carry out our mission, refusing to act because we are concerned that someone might scrutinize our decisions or actions does not seem like the “courageous calm” we have pledged to maintain.

“I will never … permit personal feelings … to influence my decisions.”
Regardless of how valid and justified we think our position is, allowing personal feelings to influence our decision about whether to take proactive police action does not align with our ethics.

“With no compromise for crime and with relentless prosecution of criminals, I will enforce the law without fear.”
Turning a blind eye to facts that would support a lawful stop, search or arrest sounds a lot like compromise and does not sound like the fearless law enforcement and the “relentless prosecution of criminals” we embrace.

We should also look beyond the Code of Ethics to our department’s broader policies as we consider the appropriate role that proactive policing should play in our overall strategies. According to Lexipol’s Patrol Function Policy, the functions of patrol include:

  • Respond to calls for assistance and reports of criminal activity
  • Act as a deterrent to crime
  • Enforce state and local laws
  • Identify community needs
  • Provide support and assistance to the community
  • Respond to emergencies

One of the ways we carry out these functions is to lawfully detect criminal activity, detain those who we reasonably suspect are engaged in criminal activity and arrest those who we have probable cause to believe have violated the law. If we “sit back and wait for the calls to come in” as some suggest, we will not be fulfilling all these listed functions of patrol. We would likely be less effective in acting as a deterrent to crime and at enforcing the law.

Despite politics and public opinion, our fundamental duty as captured in the Code of Ethics remains: “To serve the community; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and to respect the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice.” We can’t help to create a safe, healthy, community by being reactive only. The Code of Ethics and our policies require that we engage in safe, lawful, ethical, effective proactive policing efforts.

DONALD R. WEAVER is the Training Director for Lexipol and an attorney who specializes in law enforcement matters, including officer representation, police training and risk management. He spent 13 years as a police officer in Missouri and California and has worked various assignments including patrol, SWAT, overt and covert drug investigations, street crimes, forensic evidence and policy coordinator.

Deadline for 2017 VACP Awards extended to June 12, 2017 | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Deadline for 2017 VACP Awards extended to June 12, 2017

February 10, 2017 | VACP

News Image Please take the time to nominate your deserving officers or citizens for the 2017 VACP Awards for Valor, Lifesaving and Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement. An officer or citizen's actions need only have occurred prior to the deadline to be eligible for nomination by a VACP member. (In other words, they are not limited to the 2016 calendar year.)

The nomination form clearly describes the criteria for the three separate categories of awards. Please read them carefully and make sure that the officer or officers you wish to nominate fit the criteria AND you select the most appropriate award category for the nomination. In particular, the Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement Award is very unique and is not simply a “catch-all” category for anything that doesn’t fit the Valor or Lifesaving Award criteria.  We recommend reviewing the recipients of past OCLE Awards to see the type of contribution that is worthy of recognition with this award.

Please be sure to include sufficient explanation in the supporting documentation to show that the actions of the officer(s) meet the criteria for the selected award. Nominations for the 2016 awards are open to all actions occurring prior to the June 12, 2017 deadline, so long as they have not been previously submitted for consideration. (Read about previous VACP Award recipients here.)

2017 VACP Awards Nomination Form: Download Word doc | Download fillable PDF

To nominate your officer or officers, submit a completed award nomination form along with no more than three pages of supporting documentation, including the description of the action and any letters of support. Supporting documentation must provide enough detail for the judges to make a determination without having to speculate. Press clips on their own may not be sufficient because details needed by the judges to make a determination may have been excluded by either the reporter or the public information officer. We prefer that nominations be submitted by email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if possible, but will accept faxed and mailed nominations as well.

Please be prepared to provide a high-resolution digital photograph of your Valor Award nominee(s) as they will be requested upon notice of selection for inclusion in the awards program.

The Awards Committee will review the nominations and award notices will be sent to the agency heads in early August.

  • Recipients of Awards for Valor and Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement will be presented with their plaques at the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference in Roanoke, September 17-20, 2017. 
  • Lifesaving Award recognitions will be presented to the agency heads for presentation to the officer at a departmental ceremony.

We hope you will consider nominating your officers for these recognitions. If you have an questions, please feel free to contact Chief (Ret) Doug Davis, Awards Committee Chairman (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) or VACP Communications Manager Erin Schrad (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 804-285-8227).

Michael L. Brown Named Alexandria Police Chief | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Michael L. Brown Named Alexandria Police Chief

January 20, 2017 | Virginia News

News Image City Manager Mark B. Jinks has announced his appointment of Michael L. Brown as Chief of Police for the City of Alexandria, effective January 23. Brown succeeds David Huchler, who has served as Acting Chief since Chief Earl L. Cook’s retirement on October 1, 2016.

The public is invited to meet Brown at a welcome reception on Tuesday, January 24, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., in the Vola Lawson Lobby of City Hall (301 King St.).

“Chief Brown’s remarkable career has put him at the forefront of neighborhood protection, community policing, traffic safety, strategic planning, and other areas of concern here and around the country,” said Jinks. “As an Alexandria resident, Chief Brown is already familiar with local issues and will help the Alexandria Police Department continue to implement 21st-century national best practices fairly and effectively.”

Brown has nearly four decades of experience in law enforcement, safety oversight, and public policy.  He rose through the ranks of the California Highway Patrol, starting as a police officer in Los Angeles in 1977 and culminating in his appointment as state commissioner from 2004 to 2008. He previously served as chief or assistant chief in various divisions.  As commissioner, he led one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the United States, with approximately 7,900 sworn personnel, 3,100 civilian staff, over 100 field offices, and a budget of $1.8 billion at the time of Brown’s tenure.

From 2008 to 2009, Brown served as the Deputy Secretary for Public Safety for the State of California. In this capacity, he advised the Governor’s Office on public safety issues and helped develop the state’s strategic highway safety plan.

Since 2010, Brown has served as Director of the Office of Impaired Driving and Occupant Protection at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), where he is responsible for the development and implementation of national traffic safety policy and best practices. During his time at NHTSA, he has also served as Acting Associate Administrator for Research and Program Development and Acting Director of the Office of Emergency Medical Services and Office of Defect Investigation.

Brown is an Executive Fellow of the Police Foundation and serves on the Law Enforcement Committee of the Transportation Research Board. He has served as an instructor for nearly a dozen training programs for CHP, and as an adjunct professor for California State University, Sacramento. He has participated in many state and national task forces on such issues as police pursuits, homeland security, traffic safety, emergency planning, enforcement technology, and transportation.

Brown holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration from California State University, Sacramento, a master’s degree in criminal justice administration from California State University, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in management from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.  He is currently a candidate for a doctoral degree in criminology, law, and society at George Mason University.  Brown is also a graduate of the California Peace Officers Standards and Training Command College and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Academy and National Executive Institute.

Brown has been honored dozens of times by his profession and the communities he has served, including recognition as the law enforcement officer of the year at various times by the California Peace Officers Association, the Los Angeles Jewish Community, and the Los Angeles Chapter of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement.

Brown has resided in Alexandria since 2010 with his wife, Kirsten Knapp, who is an Alexandria sheriff’s deputy.

“I want to thank Chief Huchler for his service as Acting Chief, and for his more than 25 years of outstanding service so far in Alexandria,” Jinks continued.  “We look forward to working with him as he continues in the role of Deputy Chief.  I am also grateful for the tireless dedication of the more than 400 men and women who work in sworn and civilian positions in the Alexandria Police Department to help keep our community safe every day.”

For media inquiries, contact Craig T. Fifer, Director of Communications and Public Information, at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 703.746.3965.

# # #

This news release is available at: www.alexandriava.gov/95653.

Leading Law Enforcement Organizations Release National Consensus Policy on Use of Force | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Leading Law Enforcement Organizations Release National Consensus Policy on Use of Force

January 17, 2017 | National News

In April 2016, the IACP, in conjunction with the Fraternal Order of Police, assembled leading law enforcement leadership and labor organizations to examine the issue of use of force by law enforcement officers.

The extensive work of the 11 participating organizations has resulted in a National Consensus Policy on Use of Force. This consensus policy considers and reflects the broad views and experience of the field— ranging from line officers to executives. The developed and adopted consensus policy reflects the best thinking of the diverse participating organizations and is solely intended to serve as a template for law enforcement agencies to compare and enhance their existing policies.

The organizations include:

  • Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies
  • Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies
  • Fraternal Order of Police
  • Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association
  • International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training
  • National Association of Police Organizations
  • National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives
  • National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives
  • National Tactical Officers Association

While the work of the consensus organizations continues, the participating groups felt the urgency to release this policy as soon as possible, as many law enforcement agencies are currently reviewing or developing their own use-of-force policies. The 11 groups will continue to provide further guidance to the field by releasing a consensus policy discussion paper in the near future. The consensus policy discussion paper will provide additional information regarding the elements found in the consensus policy, as well as the rationale for the policy directives related to de-escalation and the use of less-lethal and deadly force.

To view the National Consensus Policy on Use of Force, visit the IACP website. The IACP looks forward to continuing to work with the participating organizations to provide further support to the law enforcement profession.

Roanoke Police Department modifies policy for Officer Involved Shooting Investigations | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Roanoke Police Department modifies policy for Officer Involved Shooting Investigations

January 13, 2017 | Virginia News

Roanoke, Va. — Following in depth discussions with law enforcement stakeholders, the Roanoke Police Department has made the decision to utilize the Virginia State Police (VSP) for the criminal investigation portion of all officer-involved shootings. The Roanoke Police Department will cooperate fully in any future investigations and is in the process of completing the necessary internal changes to aid in this endeavor.

Chief Tim Jones attributes this change to developing best practices for law enforcement agencies. “We welcome this move to an independent investigation associated with the circumstances surrounding officer involved use of lethal force or in custody death,” Chief Jones said. “While we hope that such investigative circumstances will not be necessary, we believe this change will build upon the confidence our community already has established in our department. The continued trust between the police and the community is vital and it is obvious that many of our citizens, along with professional law enforcement associations, have expressed support for this type progressive transparency and change.”

This change in policy has been shared with the Roanoke City Commonwealth’s Attorney, Donald Caldwell. His office is supportive of the Roanoke Police Department’s initiative to make changes in the investigative process. In addition the Virginia State Police Criminal Investigations Division, Salem Office, has been involved with the Roanoke Police Department and Commonwealth’s Attorney Offices to insure a smooth transition of this change to the investigation policy.

The Roanoke Police Department will continue with a parallel but separate internal investigation into all officer involved shootings to determine if the officer’s actions were within policy guidelines. Those findings will continue to be shared with the police department’s established Disciplinary Review Board, a panel which utilizes citizen representatives to review circumstances and to make recommendations to the Chief of Police related to disciplinary matters.

Contact: Scott Leamon, (540) 537-6804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Outgoing Williamsburg police chief reflects on service | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Outgoing Williamsburg police chief reflects on service

December 31, 2016 | Virginia News

By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Virginia Gazette
Dave Sloggie gave four decades to police work, and he's retiring from the Williamsburg Police Department this week. Though he's made a career working in Williamsburg, advancing through the police department was not something he planned on at first.

"I don't think there was any magic moment. It had to be somewhere around 13 or 14, where I realized I had to behave myself," Sloggie said. "I don't think there was a magic moment, I just grew on me as I kept doing it."

In his absence, the city plans to pay a firm to find viable candidates to be Sloggie's long-term replacement. The firm has not been named yet.

Deputy chief Andrew Barker will step into the interim chief role until a permanent replacement is found.

Barker, and the eventual replacement for Sloggie, will lead a department that is starting to equip officers with body cameras. The initiative, while polarizing among the community and officers, is one that is being adopted by departments across the country.

Well before body cameras became standard-issue equipment, Sloggie remembers an interaction that affirmed his path toward becoming an officer. While attending Thomas Nelson Community College after high school, Sloggie met two Hampton officers.

He considered one of them very professional and the other rather shoddy. The dichotomy there helped him know he was on the right career path.

"I started thinking I really want to carry myself like that good guy," he said.

Despite growing up in Newport News, Williamsburg is a place Sloggie knew well, even before he started working for the city.

"(My family) used to come out here all the time. I was in the 1968 Christmas Parade playing the drums in high school," he said.

Williamsburg became a nationally accredited police force in 1987 and stayed that way under Sloggie, who has been its chief since 2010. Just 3 percent of the police departments in the country are nationally accredited.

"Williamsburg is a progressive city with a modern police force that is anchored by its strong leadership, inclusive community spirit, and commitment to its CALEA accreditation standards," City Manager Marvin Collins said.

Now that he's fulfilled his duty, Sloggie says he is open to other professional opportunities as they arise. What's he really looking forward to, he said, is more time with his family.

"I have grandkids," he said. "I plan on playing a lot of golf, maybe doing a lot of fishing, and spending some time with them."

Wright can be reached by phone at 757-345-2343.

Source URL: http://www.vagazette.com/news/va-vg-police-search-1231-20161231-story.html

Milton Franklin to Join Bridgewater College as Chief of Police | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Milton Franklin to Join Bridgewater College as Chief of Police

September 27, 2016 | VACP

BRIDGEWATER, Va. – Following an extensive national search, Bridgewater College has selected Milton Franklin to join the College as Chief of Police and Director of Campus Safety and Emergency Management.

Franklin, who comes to Bridgewater with an extensive background in higher education law enforcement and emergency management, will begin on October 3, 2016. He is currently Police Administrative Lieutenant, Emergency Management Coordinator and Accreditation Manager for the J. Sargent Reynolds Community College Police Department.

“We have selected a great next leader of our Campus Police Department,” said Bridgewater College Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students Dr. Leslie Frere. “Chief Franklin’s blend of sincere care and compassion for our community along with his experience and skill in emergency situations makes him the ideal selection for our next Chief of Police.”

“I have dedicated my career to protecting college campuses," said Franklin.  "I am honored to have the opportunity to lead and work with the dedicated members of the Bridgewater College community in protecting and serving Bridgewater.”

Prior to joining J. Sargent Reynolds, Franklin worked in law enforcement at Virginia Commonwealth University, Old Dominion University and Virginia Tech as well as with various local police departments.  He has a B.S. from Virginia Tech and a graduate certificate in criminal justice education from University of Virginia. Franklin is a graduate of the esteemed FBI National Academy in Quantico and is currently completing his M.A. in homeland security from American Military University.

Bridgewater College is a private, four-year liberal arts college located in the Central Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Founded in 1880, it was the state's first private, coeducational college. Today, Bridgewater College is home to nearly 1,900 undergraduate students.

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Contact:
Abbie Parkhurst, Associate Vice President of Marketing & Communications
540-828-5782

VACP Installs 2016-2017 Executive Board | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP Installs 2016-2017 Executive Board

September 22, 2016 | VACP

News Image Chesterfield Police Colonel Thierry Dupuis becomes 2016-2017 President; Williamsburg Police Chief David Sloggie completes 2015-2016 term as VACP President

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police on September 20 installed the 2016-2017 VACP Executive Board during the Valor Awards Banquet of the association’s annual conference in Roanoke, Virginia.  The new board members are:

PRESIDENT – Colonel Thierry Dupuis, Chesterfield County – Colonel Dupuis was appointed the chief of police for the Chesterfield County Police Department in 2007. Colonel Dupuis has served within all major divisions within the department. He is the 7th chief in the department's history and the first to have held all ranks within the department including officer, sergeant, lieutenant, captain, major and lieutenant colonel.  Colonel Dupuis holds an associate degree in applied science from John Tyler Community College, a Bachelor of Science degree from Virginia Commonwealth University and a Master degree in business administration from Averett College.

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT – Chief David C. Sloggie, Williamsburg – Chief Sloggie has 40 years of experience with the Williamsburg Police Department, and holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminology from Saint Leo College and a Master in Justice Administration from Golden Gate University.  He is a 1985 graduate of the FBI National Academy, a 1992 graduate of the United States Secret Service Dignitary Protection School, and a 1996 graduate of the Police Executive Leadership School at the University of Richmond.

1ST VICE PRESIDENT –. Chief Kelvin L. Wright, Chesapeake – Chief Wright was appointed the Chesapeake police chief in 2008, and has been a champion for change in the agency and for crime reduction in the community.  Chief Wright has a Bachelor’s of Science Degree, Cum Laude, in Sociology from Saint Leo University and a Master in Public Administration from Troy University. He is active in developing leadership education programs for the Virginia Police Chiefs Foundation.

2ND VICE PRESIDENT – Chief DeWitt Cooper, Tazewell – Chief Cooper began his career working for the Hanover County Sheriff’s Office.  He next joined the Warsaw Police Department, where he was appointed Chief in 2002.  He was appointed Tazewell Police Chief in 2012, and currently is pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice Administration from Bluefield State College. Chief Cooper has attended the Virginia Police Chiefs Foundation New Chiefs School, and currently serves on the VACP Legislative Committee.

3RD VICE PRESIDENT – Chief Douglas A. Goodman, Ashland – Chief Goodman was appointed Ashland police chief in 2008, where he has worked to enhance officer productivity and effectiveness.  The Ashland Police Department is the smallest police department in the Commonwealth to have earned and maintained CALEA accreditation.  Since 2008, the work of the men and women in APD has resulted in numerous state and national awards. Chief Goodman holds a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Sociology from Virginia Tech and a Master in Public Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Virginia Center for Policing Innovation. He also remains an active Team Leader Assessor for CALEA.

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS

Chief A. J. Panebianco, Middleburg – Chief Panebianco has been the police chief in Middleburg since April, 2012.  He previously served as Chief of Police in Louisa, Warsaw and Buena Vista.  Chief Panebianco has a Bachelor of Science in the Administration of Justice from Bluefield College, and is a graduate of the Professional Executive Leadership School at the University of Richmond.  He currently serves on the Awards Committee, Budget & Finance Committee member, and Professional Image & Ethics Committee of the VACP. (2014-2018 term)

Chief Howard Hall, Roanoke County – Chief Hall was appointed to lead the Roanoke County Police Department in August 2012 after 25 years of service with the Baltimore County Police Department. He joined the Baltimore County Police in 1986 upon graduation from the University of Maryland, where he received a B.A. in Government and Politics. Chief Hall spent 20 years with the BCPD as a commander and gained experience in the areas of patrol, traffic, special operations, training, administration, accreditation compliance, and human resources. In addition to receiving a Master of Public Administration from the University of Baltimore in 1995, Hall attended the F.B.I National Academy and holds a Graduate Certificate in Police Administration. Hall is also a certified instructor and nationally recognized expert in data-driven policing – where data and analysis are used to guide police operations and solve issues. He is an active member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and serves on the organization’s Highway Safety Committee. Hall also serves as co-chair of the Virginia Highway Safety Committee. (2015-2019 term)

Chief Maggie DeBoard, Herndon – Chief DeBoard has been the Herndon Chief of Police since 2012, after serving 26 years with the Fairfax County Police Department where she rose to the rank of Deputy Chief.  She has an M.A. in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense) from the Naval Postgraduate School, a B.S. in Criminal Justice from George Mason University, and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and the WestPoint Leadership program.  Chief DeBoard serves as President of the Virginia Chapter of the Police Unity Tour, which was formed to raise awareness of all officers killed in the line of duty, and to raise funds for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) in Washington, D.C. She serves as a member of the Board of Governance of the Northern Virginia Regional Intelligence Center. (2016-2020 term)

Chief Thomas Bennett, Suffolk – Chief Bennett has served as the Suffolk Police Chief since 2009 after serving as Newport News Assistant Chief of Police.  He has a Master of Public Administration from Old Dominion University, and a B.A. in Criminology from St. Leo College.  Chief Bennett graduated from the 200th Session of the FBI National Academy, and from the 35th Session of the Police Executive Resource Forum Senior Management Institute for Police.  He is a Certified Team Leader and Assessor for the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, and has served as President of the Hampton Roads Chiefs of Police Association. (2016-2020 term)

Chief Bradley Rinehimer, James City County – Chief Rinehimer became the James City County Police Chief in 2013, and is the current President of the Hampton Roads Chiefs of Police Association.  He has extensive experience instructing in a variety of specialties in the criminal justice field for both private and public sectors, and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the Professional Executive Development School, and the FBI's Law Enforcement Executive Development School. Chief Rinehimer has a M.S. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati, and a Bachelors in Criminology from St. Leo University. (2016-2020 term)

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

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Photo Caption:

Front Row – Tazewell Chief DeWitt Cooper, Williamsburg Chief David Sloggie, Chesterfield County Chief Colonel Thierry Dupuis, Chesapeake Chief Kelvin Wright, Roanoke County Chief Howard Hall

Back Row – Herndon Chief Maggie DeBoard, Suffolk Chief Thomas Bennett, Middleburg Chief A.J. Panebianco, James City County Chief Bradley Rinehimer (Unavailable: Ashland Chief Doug Goodman)

Photo Credit: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), VACP

Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), Executive Director – 804-338-9512 (mobile)

Virginia Police Chiefs Recognize Twenty-Eight Officers with 2016 Awards for Lifesaving | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia Police Chiefs Recognize Twenty-Eight Officers with 2016 Awards for Lifesaving

September 16, 2016 | VACP

Twenty-eight Virginia public safety officers are the recipients of the 2016 Awards for Lifesaving presented by the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (VACP). The awards will be announced September 20 at the VACP Annual Conference in Roanoke, Virginia, and awarded at a later date at ceremonies at the officers’ agencies.

Chesterfield County Police Department
Officer Chad M. Byerly
Officer Gabriel C. Percival
Officer Randall W. Sykes

On January 17, 2016, at about 3:15 a.m., Officer Gabriel C. Percival responded to a house fire in the 3400 block of Wicklow Lane.  When officers arrived, the house was fully engulfed in flames. Officer Percival climbed onto the rear deck and tried to enter the house, but was stopped by thick smoke and flames. Through a window, he was able to speak with a man in a back bedroom. The man was a paraplegic and confined to his bed, and Officer Percival could not enter because of heavy smoke. As the fire spread, Officer Percival became trapped on the deck by the flames and was forced to jump to safety. Officer Chad M. Byerly and Officer Randall W. Sykes, who had since arrived on scene, were able to catch him as he jumped.

A neighbor on scene entered the home’s basement and told officers that others may be inside. Officer Percival followed the neighbor to prevent him from going further into the house, and Officers Byerly and Sykes followed to help look for additional occupants. The officers found two sleeping adults, and quickly woke them and got them to safety. Both victims survived with no injuries. The officers then cleared the bottom floor of the house and attempted to go upstairs, but were again blocked by heavy smoke and flames.

The first man Officer Percival attempted to rescue was pulled alive from the house by fire personnel, but later passed away. Tragically, five people perished in the fire. These officers without a doubt saved the lives of the two people in the basement. The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize Officers Chad M. Byerly, Gabriel C. Percival, and Randall W. Sykes with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Prince William County Police Department  
Sergeant Christopher Moore
Officer Kelly Anderson
Officer Brandon Angeloff
Officer Stacie Bronisz
Officer Kaleb Comer
Officer Brandon Fields
Officer Rhonda Fields
Officer Mike Flynn
Officer Daniela Garavito
Officer Kenny Hansen
Officer Aaron Lintz
Officer Randy Johnston
Officer Walter O’Neal
Officer Nelson Rocha
Officer Brandon Rutherford
Officer Kristin Sims
Officer Amon Weaver
Officer Susan White

 
On February 27, 2016, Prince William County Police Officers David McKeown and Jesse Hempen, along with new Officer Ashley Guindon, responded to a report of a domestic disturbance and were quickly ambushed and shot at the doorway by the male resident who was armed with an assault rifle and a handgun. After shooting the officers, the suspect retreated further in to his residence with what Officers McKeown and Hempen believed to be an intention to further harm others in the area or to retrieve additional weapons to continue his murderous assault on them or on other responding officers. These eighteen Prince William County police officers responded to the “officer down” calls from Officers Hempen and McKeown and placed themselves at great personal risk to rescue and provide medical aid to their wounded comrades, while the suspect remained a barricaded, armed threat.

Officers Kristin Sims, Aaron Lintz, Amon Weaver, Kelly Anderson, Stacie Bronisz, Kenny Hansen and Brandon Fields used as much cover and concealment as was available and assembled a rescue team to reach the disabled and critically injured McKeown, who was closest to the suspect’s home. This rescue team applied medical aids contained in their trauma kits and quickly improvised to drag Officer McKeown down the block to the safety of responding medical transport vehicles.

Officers Kaleb Comer, Brandon Angeloff, Daniela Garavito, Susan White, and Mike Flynn assembled a rescue team to reach Officer Guindon, who was gravely wounded and lying in the front yard of the home. They utilized trauma kits to attempt to care for her injuries and carried her down the block to the safety of responding medical transport vehicles.

Officers Brandon Rutherford, Rhonda Fields, Nelson Rocha, Randy Johnston, and Walter O’Neal, and Sgt. Christopher Moore assembled a rescue team to reach the critically injured Officer Hempen, who had concealed himself behind a nearby car.  They used their trauma kits to provide emergency treatment to his wounds and relayed him down the block to responding medical transport vehicles.

The scene they arrived on was horrific and these officers placed themselves in great peril from a suspect who demonstrated no hesitation to shoot human beings, in attempts to save the lives of their fellow officers. They did it with extreme courage and quick and decisive action, which allowed all three wounded officers a chance at survival by trained medical personnel. For their heroic actions, these eighteen officers are recognized with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Prince William County Police Department
Officer Sarah A. Colon
Officer Gonzalo Gracia

On January 1, 2016, Officer Sarah Colon was on routine patrol in the western district of Prince William County when she observed a vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed. The driver approached an intersection, disregarded the red traffic signal, then lost control of his vehicle and struck the traffic signal pole in the median. The impact caused the vehicle to continue traveling into oncoming lanes of traffic and crash into another vehicle. Both vehicles became engulfed in flames with the drivers trapped inside the cars.

Officer Colon and Officer Gonzalo Gracia quickly arrived on scene. Both officers first extracted the driver from the vehicle that was hit and moved her to a nearby business to wait for rescue personnel. As the officers approached the other vehicle, they noticed that the driver was trapped inside and his body was covered in fire. The fire was also starting to spread throughout the inside of the vehicle. Officer Gracia retrieved a fire extinguisher, and sprayed the driver to extinguish the fire. Officer Colon then opened the door of the burning vehicle and both officers extracted the driver as the interior and exterior of the vehicle became completely engulfed with flames. Both drivers were immediately transported to medical facilities for treatment. While the driver who was hit recovered from her injuries, unfortunately, the driver who sustained critical burns did not survive.

Officer Colon and Officer Gracia are commended for their quick actions and rescue of the drivers who were trapped inside their burning vehicles. The officers did not hesitate to place themselves in harm's way to save the lives of these citizens. The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize them with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Richmond Police Department
Master Police Officer Sarah Campbell

On January 2, 2015, Officer William Turner responded to a call from RBHA for help with an emotionally disturbed individual. Almost immediately upon his arrival, the individual produced a concealed handgun and began firing at Officer Turner.

Officer Turner was able to radio in that he had been struck by gunfire and needed assistance. Officer Sarah Campbell arrived shortly after the exchange of gunfire occurred and, realizing the seriousness of Officer Turner’s injuries, immediately took him to VCU Medical Trauma Center. While en route, Officer Campbell calmly kept dispatch advised of Turner’s condition and the situation for officers responding to the scene of the shooting.

Officer Campbell’s decision to immediately transport Officer Turner to the hospital was critical to saving his life and aiding in his recovery. For these quick actions, she is honored with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Richmond Police Department
Officer Andrew Nicholson

On May 2, 2015, while working on another call for service, Officer Andrew Nicholson heard what sounded like a motor vehicle crash. A sport utility vehicle had crashed head on into a power pole, which was now leaning with a sparking transformer dangling mere feet above the vehicle.

Officer Nicholson initially gave verbal commands for the driver to exit the vehicle and get away from the power lines, but the driver did not respond. Despite warnings from bystanders, Officer Nicholson rushed in to provide aid to the unresponsive driver. As he started to pull the driver from the vehicle, the electrical transformer exploded and produced a rain of fire and sparks around the officer, victim, and crash scene. Officer Nicholson was able to drag the victim approximately 50 yards from the danger zone and place him on his side in a recovery position to await medical treatment and transport. Officer Nicholson then continued to manage the scene, ensuring the safety of the bystanders and arriving units.

Officer Nicholson put himself in the midst of a very dangerous situation to rescue the driver at risk to his own personal safety. His bravery and professionalism in a chaotic situation made a huge difference in the outcome of the call and the well-being of the victim, who ultimately recovered from the events of the crash.

Officer Nicholson's fortitude to continue carrying out his professional duties after having risked his own life to stave off further harm to the victim is outstanding and commendable. The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize Officer Andrew Nicholson with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Virginia Beach Police Department
Officer Steven R. Brown
(now with NCIS)

On May 20, 2015, Virginia Beach police officers were dispatched to a call for two women who had their wallets and cell phones taken from them at gun point by two male suspects. Both suspects were reportedly armed with handguns. Officers responded to the scene and ran an electronic trace of the victim’s phone, locating it at a shopping center.

Officer Steven R. Brown pulled up to the shopping center and went into the wireless phone store for any evidence relating to the robbery. As Officer Brown approached the front door, he discovered it was locked and saw a Hispanic male matching the description of the robbery suspect get up while holding a black handgun. The suspect then immediately grabbed another black male and put the gun to his head. Officer Brown reported over his police radio that he had an apparent hostage situation in progress. Due to the fact he was unable to make entry into the store, he retreated to his patrol vehicle for cover.

Officer Bradley S. Colas responded to the scene to assist Brown. The suspect then exited the front of the business, holding a man hostage at gunpoint. Commands were given to drop the gun and to release the hostage. The suspect pulled the hostage closer and told the officers, if they moved, he was going to shoot the hostage. The suspect kept his back to the business and side-stepped, using the hostage as a human shield while holding a gun with his right hand pointed at the man’s head. Officers were unable to engage the suspect due to not having a clear shot.

The suspect made it to the corner of the business and moved out of sight. Officer Colas initiated a foot pursuit with the suspect. Colas observed that the hostage had been released, and then continued to chase the suspect through the parking lot. As the suspect was running, he turned over his left shoulder and pointed a gun at Officer Colas and fired a shot. Officer Colas continued to give chase as the suspect turned down a dark alley. After a failed attempt at jumping a fence, the suspect turned with the gun in his hand. Fearing for his life, Officer Colas discharged his service weapon, striking the suspect.

Officer Brown caught up with Officer Colas, who was holding the suspect at gun point. The two officers then noticed blood on the suspect’s shirt and gave commands for the suspect to move backwards towards them. The suspect complied, but immediately collapsed. Officer Brown and Colas approached with caution and took him into custody. Officer Brown immediately began giving medical aid and called for additional units to bring medical supplies. Additional officers responded and they were successful in stopping the bleeding. Once EMS was on scene, the officers briefed them of the nature of injuries and what they had done to aid the person. Medical professionals would later provide statements directly attributing the officers’ lifesaving care with the man’s ultimate recovery from his wounds.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize former Virginia Beach Police Officer Steven R. Brown with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Virginia State Police
Trooper Christopher T. Grzelak

On May 1, 2015, Trooper Christopher Grzelak was conducting stationary radar in Prince William County on Interstate 95 when he observed a motorcycle traveling at an excessive rate of speed. The trooper also observed the motorcycle was equipped with an illegal exhaust system. When motorcycle took the exit ramp for Route 123, Trooper Grzleak notified Fairfax Division Dispatch that he was in pursuit. At one point, he lost sight of the sport bike because of its speed of 80 to 90 mph. Within a minute, Trooper Grzelak caught up with the motorcycle just in time to witness it split the traffic at a Fairfax County intersection. A pickup truck was making a left turn at the stoplight and the motorcycle failed to stop in time, striking the pickup on the driver’s side.

The impact of the crash caused the motorcycle to burst into flames and catch the adjoining pickup truck on fire. The motorcyclist, a 27-year-old Woodbridge man, was pinned underneath the burning bike and was unable to move due to the severity of the injuries sustained in the crash.

Without hesitation or thought for his own safety, Trooper Grzelak rushed to the man’s aid and reached into the flames to pull him out from underneath the motorcycle. The man’s legs were on fire at this point. Once freed from the wreckage, the Trooper used his own hands to put out the fire in an effort to save the motorcyclist from further injury.

Seeing the man was not breathing or responsive, Trooper Grzelak cleared the man’s airway in an attempt to help him breathe. A rescue squad arrived within a minute or two and the EMTs were able to continue their life-saving efforts. Unfortunately, the motorcyclist’s injuries and burns were too severe and he succumbed to his injuries three days later at the hospital.

Trooper Grzelak demonstrated exceptional valor in his extreme efforts to do everything he could in order to save this man’s life. Despite great risk to himself, Trooper Grzelak reached into the flames to pull the man to safety and then put the flames out in an effort to keep the man from burning alive. The Trooper’s selfless actions resulted in himself suffering minor burns to his own hands.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize Virginia State Police Trooper Christopher Grzelak with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

Virginia State Police
Supervisory Special Agent Stephen M. Rusher

On the afternoon of September 22, 2015, Supervisory Special Agent Stephen M. Rusher witnessed a sport utility vehicle run off the roadway and strike a metal support pole for an overhead message board. The special agent immediately notified dispatch of the crash and pulled over to render aid to the driver.

The impact of the crash had crushed the entire front end of the vehicle, pinning the semi-conscious male driver against the dashboard. The vehicle and the grass underneath it also had caught fire. Special Agent Rusher ran back to his state vehicle to retrieve his fire extinguisher in an attempt to put out the spreading flames.

By now, several other motorists had pulled over to assist and also used their fire extinguishers. Their united efforts doused the flames. With the help of the bystanders, Special Agent Rusher worked to open the vehicle’s doors. At one point, a rear door was opened, and as the group attempted to remove debris to rescue the driver, flames erupted from under the driver’s seat.

Special Agent Rusher used the remainder of the contents of his fire extinguisher on this latest blaze. It appeared as if the fire was temporarily suppressed, though smoking heavily. Other rescuers had broken the front window out of the crashed vehicle and aided Special Agent Rusher with working to free the trapped driver. Despite a bystander begging him and another rescuer to get away from the burning vehicle, Special Agent Rusher refused to let the man burn alive. He jumped back onto the guardrail and yelled for help. Another rescuer jumped up beside the special agent and the two worked vigorously to dislodge the driver and pull him through the window.

The flames were now consuming the interior of the vehicle. Due to the extreme heat, Special Agent Rusher and the other rescuer were not able to lean in far enough to free the man. At this point, the driver had regained consciousness, but both of his legs were broken and he was unable to push himself up and out. Special Agent Rusher pulled as hard as he could one final time. He was able to jerk the victim’s upper torso towards the window. Despite the agent yelling for the driver to move with him, in the confusion of the fire and smoke, the victim pulled back. The flames had now reached the top of the window and an intense burst of heat knocked Special Agent Rusher backwards off the guardrail. When Special Agent Rusher turned around, he discovered the driver had managed to drag his lower torso out the window and had fallen to the ground.

The Special Agent rushed to the aid of the driver and with the help of other rescuers dragged the man away from the SUV, which was engulfed in fire seconds later. The driver survived the crash and fire, despite 21% of his body being severely burned and suffering extreme trauma to his legs and feet. Special Agent Rusher suffered blisters from exposure to the fire, and minor cuts and bruises from the broken glass and debris. If it had not been for Special Agent Rusher’s determination and dedication to duty, the man would have perished in the fire.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize Virginia State Police Supervisory Special Agent Stephen M. Rusher with the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.

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The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

Contact: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512 • Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Virginia State Police Captain Thomas W. Turner to Receive 2016 President’s Award | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia State Police Captain Thomas W. Turner to Receive 2016 President’s Award

September 16, 2016 | VACP

News Image Virginia State Police Captain Thomas W. Turner, a 50-year-veteran of the department, is the 2016 recipient of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police President’s Award. Captain Turner was recognized at the VACP Annual Awards Banquet on September 20 at the Hotel Roanoke Conference Center.

Captain Turner began his career with the Virginia State Police in 1966 as a dispatcher and transitioned to State Trooper just one day after his 21st birthday. From his early days with the department, Trooper Turner made serving the public the focus of his law enforcement career. And as he rose through the ranks, he maintained this priority in his duties and actions.

Captain Turner’s true talent emerged when he was first assigned to the Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) as a lieutenant in 1996, where he later became Division Commander in 2007.

As the Division Commander, Captain Turner has been on the ground floor of creating data systems for the administration of justice. He is a visionary, capable of not only seeing the needs of criminal justice agencies, but also envisioning how such systems can be used to better serve the administration of justice. Captain Turner has put tools in place to ensure data is retrievable in a variety of formats for countless criminal justice entities so that criminal history data can be used throughout the criminal justice system.

Virginia has one of the nation’s leading sex offender registries because of Captain Turner’s commitment and tireless efforts. He has been integral to the development of the registry and serves as a ready resource for law enforcement agencies that use the registry.

Captain Turner’s leadership enabled the Virginia Firearms Transaction Center to grow into a nationally recognized and model program. The center handles the speedy transfer of firearms to non-prohibited persons while maintaining an impressive record of arresting individuals who are prohibited from purchasing or possessing a firearm.

Captain Turner chairs of the FBI’s Advisory Policy Board, which makes recommendations to the Director regarding policy, technical, and operational issues for the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division programs, including the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report.

Captain Turner has served as Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors for the National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics, and Criminal History Record (SEARCH). He was also the Chairman of the Board of Directors for AFIS Internet, and Vice Chairman of the FBI/Compact Council’s Subcommittee on Policy and Procedures.  He fully recognizes the importance of his role on these national committees and uses his expansive knowledge and expertise to improve criminal justice services to Virginia’s criminal justice agencies.

Recently, Captain Turner was recognized by the FBI for his pivotal role in solving a series of rape cases in Virginia and Kuwait. His persistence coupled with his latent print database knowledge led the Norfolk Police to make inquiries into recently accessible non-criminal fingerprint files. A latent print taken from a Norfolk crime scene matched fingerprints of a Navy serviceman. The FBI deemed this case the “Biometric Hit of the Year.”

As a subject matter expert in the vast array of criminal justice information/data, Captain Turner’s knowledge and expertise is often sought by law enforcement officials across the Commonwealth and far beyond. He personally involves himself with other agency’s concerns and provides expert knowledge and direction. In Virginia, most law enforcement executives know that if they have a CJIS question, Captain Turner will know the answer—and he won’t have to do “research” to provide a response.

In the fall, Captain Turner will retire from the Virginia State Police with 50 years of service to the Commonwealth. He will leave a tremendous void in the agency and across Virginia. His historical knowledge of criminal justice and his overwhelming desire to serve can never be replaced. He will truly be missed, and Virginia law enforcement will never be able to thank him enough for this enduring dedication.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to recognize Virginia State Police Captain Tom Turner with the 2016 President’s Award.

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NOTE: The CJIS Division is the largest Division within the Department of State Police with 252 employees. CJIS houses the Central Criminal Records Exchange (CCRE), the Virginia Criminal Information Network (VCIN), the Sex Offender Registry, the Firearms Transaction Center, the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and numerous other critical information systems/services for criminal justice purposes. Although CJIS provides critical support for the Department of State Police, much of the work of this very important division is dedicated to providing law enforcement support and services to other criminal justice agencies, government entities and the people of the Commonwealth and beyond.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

 

Contact: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512 • Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Photo Caption: Williamsburg Police Chief David C. Sloggie, 2015-16 VACP President & Captain Thomas W. Turner, Virginia State Police

Photo Credit: Erin Schrad, VACP

Additional photos at http://photos.vachiefs.org/VACP-Conferences/2016-VACP-Annual-Conference/Banquet-Board-Installation

Twenty-Two Virginia Law Enforcement Officers to Receive 2016 VACP Awards for Valor | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Twenty-Two Virginia Law Enforcement Officers to Receive 2016 VACP Awards for Valor

September 16, 2016 | VACP

News Image Officers from Chesterfield County, Hanover County, Prince William County, Richmond, Virginia Beach and Virginia State Police recognized for heroism; Prince William County Police Officer Ashley Guindon honored posthumously

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (VACP) on September 20, 2016 presented twenty-two Virginia law enforcement officers from six agencies with the Association’s highest honor, the Award for Valor. The awards were presented at the Valor Awards Banquet at the VACP Annual Conference, held this year at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, Virginia. The Honorable Mark R. Herring, Attorney General of Virginia, was the keynote speaker and assisted in the presentation of the awards.

The Award for Valor recognizes a law enforcement officer who, in the line of duty, performs an act of extraordinary heroism while engaged with an adversary at imminent personal risk.

Officers receiving the 2016 Awards for Valor are:

Chesterfield County Police Department
Officer First Class Chad T. Shockley

On January 3, 2016, Chesterfield County Police Officer First Class Chad T. Shockley responded to a disturbance call with the report of a subject breaking into a home. Officer Shockley recognized that the suspect possibly was involved in a previous disturbance and assault he had investigated. The caller advised that she was holding the door shut and that the male had a knife.

Officer Shockley observed a man attempting to force entry into the house, and honked his police vehicle horn to get the suspect’s attention. The suspect yelled something at Officer Shockley, then kicked the door open and went inside. Officer Shockley heard a female screaming inside the residence and gave chase. When Officer Shockley got to the front door, he saw the suspect falling to the ground. The female yelled that the suspect had stabbed himself. Officer Shockley ordered the suspect “to get rid of the knife.” The suspect had the long-blade knife in hand as he rose and started to advance towards Officer Shockley. Officer Shockley reacted to the threat by firing one round at the suspect. The suspect was hit by Officer Shockley’s round, fell to the ground and dropped the knife. Officer Shockley kicked the knife out of the suspect’s reach, provided updates on the situation for responding officers, requested rescue, and rendered first aid to the suspect by attempting to control bleeding. Officers began to arrive on scene to assist.

The investigation revealed that the homeowner/caller had received a phone call from the suspect earlier that morning, threatening to kill her and her family. She stated that she had known the suspect for about three years, and he was currently renting property nearby. She stated that the subject had a history of mental illness and was possibly off his medication. She also stated that there had been incidents in the past when the suspect was off his medication and became extremely aggressive to those around him.

Officer First Class Chad T. Shockley’s immediate response to the scene along with his life saving reactions clearly saved the lives of the two occupants of the residence. For his courageous act during a dangerous situation and his commitment to the preservation of life while in harm’s way, Officer Shockley is presented with the 2016 VACP Award for Valor.

Hanover County Sheriff’s Office
Investigator Matthew McGrain
Investigator David Parrish

On the afternoon of October 13, 2015, Hanover County Sheriff’s Office Investigator Matthew McGrain and Investigator David Parrish responded to a call for service for shots fired from a residence. As they approached the home, they could hear a woman frantically screaming from behind the residence.

Investigators McGrain and Parrish rounded the back of the house and encountered a male subject armed with a handgun. He was squatting over the sobbing female victim, who was seated against the porch railing with her hands bound together with zip ties. Another female subject was standing close behind the suspect, clutching a baby in her arms.

The investigators verbally challenged the male subject as they moved towards him to grab his attention. The suspect froze, glaring at the officers, who continued to use verbal de-escalating techniques as they moved towards him. Fortunately, the suspect dropped the firearm on the porch and stepped away from the victims. The investigators handcuffed the male suspect and took him into custody without further incident.
The victim disclosed that she, the suspect’s mother, and her seven-month-old child had been abducted by the male subject, who is her child’s father. The abduction took place following a doctor’s appointment earlier that day.

Investigator McGrain’s and Investigator Parrish’s quick response saved the life of at least one if not all three of the victims. For their impeccable professional judgment as well as their decisive actions, Investigator Matthew McGrain and Investigator David Parrish are presented with the 2016 VACP Award for Valor.

Prince William County Police Department
Officer Ashley Guindon (Posthumous)
Officer David McKeown
Officer Jesse Hempen

On February 27, 2016, Prince William County Police Officers Jesse Hempen and David McKeown, along with new officer Ashley Guindon, responded to a report of a domestic disturbance. The victim was able to communicate the assault prior to the phone being abruptly disconnected. Upon arrival, all three officers were quickly ambushed at the doorway by the male resident who was armed with an assault rifle and a handgun. This suspect used the assault rifle to shoot and critically wound each of the officers in the front yard and retreated into the house.

Officers McKeown and Hempen believed the suspect intended to further harm others in the area, including any responding officers. Officer Hempen, while injured, crawled to a concealed position to radio back critical information about the shooting. Though critically wounded, Officers McKeown and Hempen calmly and clearly communicated the movement of the suspect, provided perimeter points of vantage, and conveyed each of the officers’ positions, observed injuries and associated medical needs. All three officers remained in imminent risk for continued assault by the suspect, but remained vigilant to protect both neighbors in the area and the elementary school-aged son of the involved parties who was attempting to flee the home. Their diligence and commitment to containing the suspect ensured the safety of the young boy and prevented any additional officers or citizens from being harmed.

The officers were immediately disabled upon arriving at the scene of what turned out to be the murder of a wife by her husband, and the murder of their fellow officer, Ashley Guindon, who was shot along with them. Officers McKeown, Hempen, and Guindon demonstrated the utmost bravery and courage in continuing to fight for their lives, the lives of the neighboring citizens, the son of the suspect, and the lives of their fellow officers responding to assist them. Because of the information they were able to convey, the suspect was taken into custody without further injury to any persons. They were faced with an unimaginable situation and their acts of valor allowed resolution to this terrible situation and restored safety to the community.

It was Officer Ashley Guindon’s first and last day on the job, and she responded to the scene with confidence and skill, prepared to defend the innocent victims and her fellow officers. The loss of her life in the line of duty is a sober reminder of the serious risks that our officers face each and every day, on each and every call.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to honor Prince William County Officer Jesse Hempen, Officer David McKeown and – posthumously – Officer Ashley Guindon with the 2016 VACP Award for Valor.

(NOTE: Eighteen Prince William County police officers responded to the “officer down” calls from Officers Hempen and McKeown and placed themselves at great personal risk to rescue and provide medical aid to their wounded comrades, while the suspect remained a barricaded, armed threat. These officers were selected to receive the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.)

Richmond Police Department
Officer Ryan Bailey
Officer Jacob DeBoard

On the evening of August 5, 2015, Richmond Police officers received a call with the description and location of a known armed person by the name of Keshawn, who had flashed a weapon and had previously shot another individual. As Sergeant Robert Fleming and Officer Jennifer Ward arrived on the scene, a man matching the given description was observed walking down the alley. As those officers approached, the man ran away from them toward Officers Ryan Bailey and Jacob Deboard, who were driving up the alley.

The pair exited their vehicle and engaged the man in conversation, who identified himself as Keshawn Hargrove. It was then that Officer DeBoard noticed an object, believed to be a firearm, in the man’s waistband. Asked if he would come closer, the suspect became nervous and took off running back up the alley towards Fleming and Ward. Both Officers Bailey and DeBoard pursued on foot, dodging the obstacles Hargrove pushed into their path. As Officer Bailey closed in on Hargrove, both men fell to the ground. Upon standing, Hargrove produced the firearm from his waistband and shot Officer Bailey in his left arm. Hargrove then continued running up the alley, shooting at the officers as he fled. Officers Bailey and DeBoard returned fire on the suspect while Sergeant Fleming took cover. Hargrove eventually fell next to a fence as he attempted to round a corner. Officer DeBoard challenged him to show his hands, but he proved unresponsive. Noticing this, Sergeant Fleming kicked the gun away from Hargrove and placed him in handcuffs.

Officer DeBoard radioed for assistance and Sergeant Christopher Jernigan and Officer William Campbell arrived on the scene. Officer Bailey was quickly moved to the back seat of the police car by Fleming and DeBoard, where Campbell then applied pressure to his wound while Jernigan drove the vehicle to the hospital. Their quick action and rapid response is credited with saving Officer Bailey from severe blood loss.

These officers, knowing that they were going into a life-threatening situation, performed with the utmost valor in the face of grave danger. At a risk of their own peril, they bravely exchanged gunfire with a known convicted felon. The VACP proudly honors Richmond Police Officers Ryan Bailey and Jacob DeBoard with the 2016 Award for Valor.

Richmond Police Department
Officer Matthew Cavanaugh

On the afternoon of November 16, 2015, while sitting in their vehicle at a gas station, two victims were abducted by an armed individual and forced to drive to a bank. One of the two victims was ordered to enter the bank and withdraw money. Instead, he entered the bank and told staff about what was going on, and they notified police.

The suspect made the driver of the vehicle drive away as officers arrived. An officer in the area spotted the vehicle and attempted to conduct a traffic stop, but the vehicle did not yield. It was then that the officer saw the driver was being held at gunpoint. A pursuit was initiated and the officer radioed that the incident was now being treated as a hostage situation. 

As the pursuit passed through Third Precinct, Officer Matthew Cavanaugh joined in as the third vehicle. Due to the nature of the incident, the decision was made to allow Cavanaugh to stay in that position as support due to his training as a SWAT officer and his ability to perform professionally and calmly in high stress situations.

The pursuit entered Henrico County and spike strips were deployed to disable the victim’s vehicle, which did travel over the spikes but continued beyond that point. The strips however did disable the first two police cruisers, leaving Officer Cavanaugh as the lead vehicle in pursuit. The victim’s vehicle eventually lost its tires and spun out of control before coming to a stop. The suspect then fired at the victim, striking him in the head, and again through the back windshield at Officer Cavanaugh, striking him in the ear.

Officer Cavanaugh then maneuvered his vehicle into a strategic position and exited, taking cover behind the door and engine block. The suspect was still firing at Officer Cavanaugh and a bullet struck the spotlight next to the officer's head. Knowing the victim was still in the vehicle, Officer Cavanaugh fired several well-aimed rounds at the suspect, rendering him unable to continue firing. The suspect was then detained and the victim retrieved from the vehicle and taken to the hospital for treatment where he was able to recover from his injuries. Officer Cavanaugh also was treated at the scene and sent to the hospital. The scene was contained and the suspect treated for his injuries and eventually charged with multiple offenses.

Officer Cavanaugh’s calm and skilled response to a highly volatile situation saved the lives of the victims, his fellow officers and the suspect while successfully stopping a dangerous threat. The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to honor Richmond Police Officer Matthew Cavanaugh with the 2016 Award for Valor.

Richmond Police Department
Master Police Officer William Turner

On January 2, 2015 in the early afternoon, Master Police Officer William Turner responded to a call from Richmond Behavioral Health Authority to assist with an emotionally disturbed individual. Upon arrival, Officer Turner observed two RBHA social workers with a male individual and asked if he was the subject in question. Almost immediately, the male subject produced a concealed handgun and began firing at Officer Turner.

Officer Turner, a 31-year veteran of the department, sustained serious gunshot wounds to his eye, lower abdomen, and leg. Officer Turner immediately sought cover and was able return accurate fire at the suspect, incapacitating him.

Officer Turner was able to radio in that he had been struck by gunfire and needed assistance. Officer Sarah Campbell arrived shortly after the exchange of gunfire and, realizing the seriousness of Officer Turner’s injuries, immediately took him to VCU Medical Trauma Center. While en route, Officer Campbell calmly kept dispatch advised of Turner’s condition and the situation for officers responding to the scene of the shooting. Officer Campbell’s decision to immediately transport Officer Turner to the hospital was critical to saving his life and aiding in his recovery. (NOTE: For these quick actions, Officer Campbell was selected to receive the 2016 VACP Award for Lifesaving.)

Officer Turner, after undergoing numerous surgeries at VCU Medical Center, was released to return home several weeks later to continue his recovery.

Officer William Turner, although critically wounded by the gunman, used sound tactics to return fire and incapacitate his assailant. He is the embodiment of what recruits are taught every day at the Richmond Police Academy — “Never give up!” His courage and actions most likely prevented this armed, mentally disturbed individual from causing further harm to other citizens and responding officers. The VACP is pleased to honor veteran Richmond Police Officer William Turner with the 2016 Award for Valor.

Virginia Beach Police Department
Officer Bradley S. Colas

On May 20, 2015, Virginia Beach police officers were dispatched to a call for two women who had their wallets and cell phones taken from them at gun point by two male suspects. Both suspects were reportedly armed with handguns. Officers responded to the scene and ran an electronic trace of the victim’s phone, locating it at a shopping center.

Officer Steven R. Brown pulled up to the shopping center and went into the wireless phone store for any evidence relating to the robbery. As Officer Brown approached the front door, he discovered it was locked and saw a Hispanic male matching the description of the robbery suspect get up while holding a black handgun. The suspect then immediately grabbed another black male and put the gun to his head. Officer Brown reported over his police radio that he had an apparent hostage situation in progress. Due to the fact he was unable to make entry into the store, he retreated to his patrol vehicle for cover.

Officer Bradley S. Colas responded to the scene to assist Brown. The suspect then exited the front of the business, holding a man hostage at gunpoint. Commands were given to drop the gun and to release the hostage. The suspect pulled the hostage closer and told the officers, if they moved, he was going to shoot the hostage. The suspect kept his back to the business and side-stepped, using the hostage as a human shield while holding a gun with his right hand pointed at the man’s head. Officers were unable to engage the suspect due to not having a clear shot.

The suspect made it to the corner of the business and moved out of sight. Officer Colas initiated a foot pursuit with the suspect. Colas observed that the hostage had been released, and then continued to chase the suspect through the parking lot. As the suspect was running, he turned over his left shoulder and pointed a gun at Officer Colas and fired a shot. Officer Colas knew the individual had just robbed two people, held a man hostage, and fired a gun at him. Despite placing himself in an imminently perilous position, he knew that the suspect needed to be apprehended before he hurt someone.

As the suspect ran into a dark alley, Officer Colas continued to give chase. After a failed attempt at jumping a fence, the suspect turned with the gun in his hand. Fearing for his life, Officer Colas discharged his service weapon, striking the suspect.

Officer Brown caught up with Officer Colas, who was holding the suspect at gun point. It was at this point that the officers noticed blood on the suspect’s shirt. The officers gave commands to the suspect to move backwards towards them. The suspect complied, but immediately collapsed. Officer Brown and Colas approached with caution and took him into custody. Officer Brown immediately began giving medical aid and called for additional units to bring medical supplies.

Additional officers responded and they were successful in stopping the bleeding. Once EMS was on scene, the officers briefed them of the nature of injuries and what they had done to aid the person. Medical professionals would later provide statements directly attributing the officers’ lifesaving care with the man’s ultimate recovery from his wounds.

For his bravery and skilled response, the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police proudly presents the 2016 Award for Valor to Virginia Beach Police Officer Bradley Colas.

Virginia Beach Police Department
Master Police Officer Edward Donohue
Master Police Officer Paul Lynch
Master Police Officer Brian Staub

On May 1, 2015, Virginia Beach police officers were dispatched to a call to find that a man had been shot in the abdomen and the suspect was located inside a nearby apartment. The victim advised officers that he had been shot by his friend. As the victim was being evacuated, the suspect began firing shots from inside his apartment. Multiple officers responded to the scene and began setting up a perimeter to contain the suspect. For the next thirty minutes, the suspect and officers exchanged gunfire. Throughout the ensuing gun battle, officers reported hearing bullets going through the air by their heads and striking nearby objects. It was clear this subject was an imminent threat to officers and others in the immediate area.

Master Police Officers Edward Donohue, Paul Lynch, and Brian Staub arrived on scene and were informed that people were standing in an exposed open area north of the target apartment. Concerned about their safety, the officers immediately responded to that location. They soon realized this area was located in a spot that gave the suspect an avenue of escape if he left the apartment. The gunfire abruptly stopped and the suspect suddenly exited the apartment and began running towards the officers, armed with a handgun. MPO Lynch took aim with his firearm; however, he realized that if he fired, the round could possibly go through the apartment in the background, so he held his fire.

The officers immediately identified themselves and began to command the suspect to “get on the ground” and “drop the gun.” The suspect changed direction and began to run to the back of a building where he was in dark shadows and the officers could not see him. MPO Staub used his flashlight to illuminate the suspect and the three officers left safe cover to give chase — a highly dangerous but courageous action. As they were chasing the suspect, he threw down the handgun and went to the ground, lying flat, in a facedown position. As the officers approached, MPO Staub and MPO Lynch provided cover as MPO Donohue moved in to make the arrest. MPO Donohue observed a gun in a holster the suspect was wearing and another gun tucked into the suspect’s waistband.

As MPO Donohue began handcuffing the suspect’s left hand, the suspect made a movement toward his waistband with his right hand. After subduing the suspect, Donohue was able to fully handcuff the suspect and remove the weapons from him, along with additional magazines and a knife. At this point the suspect was extremely disorderly and attempted to spit on officers and rescue workers who were attending to the gunshot wound on his lower leg.

The heroic actions of these officers were clearly done at extreme personal risk as they protected their fellow officers and the citizens of Virginia Beach. While these officers would have been justified in using deadly force in order to stop the suspect and prevent further risk to the public or themselves, they considered the potential harm to the innocent citizens in the apartment complex. Their sheer professionalism allowed them to take the armed offender into custody without deadly force.

The VACP is honored to present these three Virginia Beach Master Police Officers — Paul Lynch, Brian Staub and Edward Donohue — with the 2016 Award for Valor.

Virginia State Police
Sergeant James A. Pew

Sergeant James Pew had gotten the call from a friend about a vehicle parked in front of the friend’s house that appeared to have been abandoned. Sergeant Pew was on his way to the office when he decided to go by the friend’s Virginia Beach residence and check on the vehicle.

Sergeant Pew found the Ford Explorer still parked alongside the curb. When he ran the license plate, the Ford Explorer came back as being reported stolen. Sergeant Pew was on the phone with Virginia Beach Police to follow up on their stolen vehicle report when he observed a black Chevrolet Blazer slam on the brakes as it began to turn onto the street where Sergeant Pew was located. The vehicle quickly sped off in the opposite direction.

Believing the Blazer may be involved with the stolen vehicle, Sergeant Pew immediately gave pursuit. With emergency lights and siren activated, Sergeant Pew attempted to stop the Blazer as it raced through a neighborhood, coming to a stop in the back of a cul-de-sac. Before the sergeant could even put his cruiser into park, he came under fire.

The driver of the Blazer immediately began shooting his handgun at the sergeant’s patrol car. Meanwhile, the Blazer’s passenger — dressed in camouflage, body armor, and a ski mask — was now advancing towards the sergeant’s vehicle and relentlessly firing rounds from his high-powered rifle into the patrol car.

As bullets ripped through the windshield into his vehicle, Sergeant Pew opened his door and used it for cover so he could safely roll out of his vehicle and engage the suspects. At this point, the masked passenger retreated. The momentary lull in gunfire enabled Sergeant Pew to open the driver’s side backdoor so he could retrieve his rifle. Both suspects were already shooting at him again.

This time the masked passenger was only 50 yards away, having taken cover behind a pickup truck in a nearby driveway. Sergeant Pew radioed to Virginia State Police dispatch “shots fired,” and took cover from behind the driver’s side passenger door as he returned fire with the suspects.

Having emptied his service pistol, the sergeant reloaded while moving to the back of his patrol car. The driver of the Blazer, while still shooting at the sergeant, drove out of the cul-de-sac and sped past the patrol car. Sergeant Pew rapidly moved to the passenger side of his patrol car in an attempt to put the engine block between him and the barrage of bullets. As the Blazer fled the scene, the passenger took off on foot between the houses.

Approximately 10 minutes following the conclusion of the shootout, Virginia Beach Police had the passenger in custody without further incident or any injury to the officers. The next day, the driver of the Blazer was also apprehended without further incident.

Sergeant Pew was transported to a nearby hospital for treatment of a multitude of cuts and scrapes to his face, arms and legs caused by the shattering glass and ricocheted gravel. It was during his exam that the doctor discovered the mark left by the bullet that had grazed the sergeant’s left temple.

What had started out as a simple follow up to a friend’s request almost cost the 16-year Virginia State Police veteran his life. The abandoned vehicle led to the arrest of two serial bank robbery suspects. The vehicle Sergeant Pew was initially checking on was part of the men’s getaway routine after robbing a bank. Sergeant Pew didn’t know that the two men had just finished robbing a nearby bank at gunpoint when they pulled up and found Sergeant Pew checking on their strategically-placed vehicle. The FBI, Virginia Beach Police Department, and Chesapeake Police Department are still investigating the men’s possible connection to 12 other armed bank robberies in the area going back to January 2011.

Sergeant Pew relentlessly pursued two very dangerous suspects, put his own life at risk in an effort to apprehend them, and still put others’ safety before his own by making certain no citizens were injured in the exchange of gunfire on their street. In addition, his perseverance and service resulted in the capture of two serial bank robbers who have eluded local and federal law enforcement for the past four years.

In recognition of his valor and selfless service, the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to present Virginia State Police Sergeant James A. Pew with the 2016 Award of Valor.

Virginia State Police
First Sergeant Gary J. Hack, Jr.
Special Agent Brian N. Webster
Trooper Robert E. Brooke, III
Trooper Andrew C.S. Goss
Trooper Jason J. Hite
Trooper Jared T. Murdoch
Trooper Christopher B. Sizemore

The 15-hour hostage standoff started Friday night, December 18, 2015, with a family calling the Campbell County Sheriff’s Office for help. A 24-year-old male relative, previously diagnosed with a mental health problem, took his 3-year-old son hostage at gunpoint inside a locked bedroom of a doublewide trailer. Overnight, the male subject had already fired at the sheriff’s office SWAT team positioned inside the trailer.

At daybreak the next morning, the Virginia State Police Appomattox Division Tactical Team relieved the sheriff’s office and took up position inside the trailer to continue negotiations with the father. The VSP Assistant Tact Team Leader, Trooper Andrew C.S. Goss led his team — Troopers Robert E. Brooke, III, Jason J. Hite, Jared T. Murdoch, and Christopher B. Sizemore — into the residence.

Initially, Trooper Goss directed the Tact Team to position in the kitchen of the trailer, as it provided the best cover for team members to safely stage and prepare for entry. It also provided the safest line of sight to the small alcove and the door of the bedroom containing the man and his young son.

It was decided that Special Agent Gary J. Hack, Jr. needed to enter the residence to spur negotiations with the male subject. Inside the trailer, Special Agent Hack’s efforts to negotiate were met with limited, hostile feedback and verbal threats by the gunman to harm himself and his son. The Tact Team and Special Agent Hack were increasingly concerned for the toddler’s welfare due to the duration and intensity of the standoff. (NOTE: Special Agent Hack has since been promoted to First Sergeant.)

It was almost noon when Trooper Goss made the call to make entry into the bedroom to rescue the child and apprehend the father. Trooper Brooke, assigned to the .40-caliber less-than-lethal rifle, was positioned just behind the corner of the kitchen counter to the left of Special Agent Hack and alongside Trooper Hite, who was providing cover with the M-4 patrol rifle. Trooper Sizemore was also in position with his rifle providing cover. Trooper Murdoch was kneeling behind a ballistic shield and closest to the bedroom that contained the armed male subject and the child.

Trooper Goss and Special Agent Brian N. Webster prepared an explosive charge in the kitchen with Trooper Murdoch providing them cover with the ballistic shield. To prevent the barricaded male subject from overhearing the operational plans, Special Agent Hack kept talking to the defiant subject. As the Tact Team members had to move into position, Special Agent Hack found himself without cover.

The plan was for Troopers Brooke, Hite and Sizemore to stay in position at the counter as Trooper Murdoch advanced Trooper Goss and Special Agent Webster towards the bedroom door for placement of the explosive charge in advance of the Team making entry. Just as Trooper Goss and Special Agent Webster rounded the corner of the kitchen, Special Agent Hack and Trooper Murdoch heard what sounded like a doorknob turning — and without warning — the small child emerged from the bedroom and wandered into the living area just feet away from the Tact Team.

Trooper Murdoch, with his pistol trained on the bedroom door and his shield resting against his knee, used his free hand to gesture the child towards him, calling the bewildered little boy to the safety of the Tact Team. Special Agent Hack, who was still exposed and without cover, did the same — despite being at risk for his own safety — even using a water bottle to entice the toddler towards him and Trooper Murdoch.

Within seconds, the father emerged from the bedroom. As Trooper Murdoch commanded the father to show his hands and come out slowly, the father revealed a pistol and pointed it directly at the Trooper. Trooper Hite yelled “gun” as Trooper Murdoch fired.

Trooper Hite also fired as the father shot several rounds at Trooper Murdoch, who was still crouched behind the shield on the floor. When the firing ceased, the air was choked with smoke and dust from bullets penetrating the drywall and the smoke alarm was going off. Now the little boy was nowhere to be found, and the father had retreated back into the bedroom.

Fearing that the father had retaken the boy, Trooper Goss quickly assembled the Tact Team members into a “stack” and readied it to make entry into the bedroom. As Troopers Goss, Murdoch, Brooke, Hite, and Sizemore moved into the alcove, they heard the muffled sounds of the crying child. It was then that they realized the little boy, who was not hurt, was in the bedroom opposite the one they were about to enter.

Trooper Murdoch left the safety of the group, at the direction of Trooper Goss, and entered the opposing bedroom, calling the child by name. Dropping the shield, Trooper Murdoch pulled down his protective mask so he wouldn’t frighten the sobbing boy. He gently picked up the toddler and repeatedly reassured him that he was safe. He placed the child against his armor, away from the still-armed subject in the opposite bedroom, and kept his pistol trained on the door as the Tact Team made final entry.

With Trooper Murdoch in the other room, Trooper Sizemore stepped up to take the shield and lead Troopers Goss, Hite and Brooke into the bedroom. There they encountered the father inside still armed, but unconscious and bleeding. The troopers secured the room and called for medical assistance for the subject.

As soon as it was safe to exit, Trooper Murdoch — still cuddling the little boy — left the bedroom and rushed the boy to immediate medical attention.

The medical examiner confirmed that the father had fired the fatal shot and taken his own life prior to the Tactical Team’s entry into the bedroom. The young boy was returned to his family and survived the entire ordeal without physical injury. No State Police or local law enforcement personnel were injured.

The concerted actions demonstrated by the Tact Team members, Special Agent Hack and Special Agent Webster were above and beyond the call of duty. They displayed exceptional leadership, courage, and professionalism by putting their lives on the line to save a young child’s life and protect one another from harm.

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is proud to present the 2016 Award for Valor to Virginia State Police First Sergeant Gary J. Hack, Jr.; Special Agent Brian Webster; and Troopers Robert E. Brooke, III; Andrew Goss; Jason Hite; Jared Murdoch and Christopher Sizemore.

-#-

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (www.vachiefs.org) is a statewide charitable organization of federal, state and local police chiefs and other law enforcement executives dedicated to improving the professionalism of police agencies in Virginia and to providing training and education programs for law enforcement executives. The Association was founded in 1926 and has more than 600 members.

Contact: Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512 • Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Pictured: (front row, l to r.) Colas, Staub, Donohue, Guindon, Hempen, Lynch.
(middle row, l. to r.) McGrain, Shockley, Hack, Brooke, Murdoch, Goss, Sizemore.
(back row l. to r.) Parrish, McKeown, Turner, DeBoard, Bailey, Webster.

Not pictured: Cavanaugh, Pew, Hite.

Photo Credit: Erin Schrad, VACP

Additional photos at http://photos.vachiefs.org/VACP-Conferences/2016-VACP-Annual-Conference/Banquet-Board-Installation

2016 Virginia Buzzkill Campaign Against Underage Drinking to Launch Sept. 2 at NSU | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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2016 Virginia Buzzkill Campaign Against Underage Drinking to Launch Sept. 2 at NSU

August 30, 2016 | VACP

News Image Norfolk State University Police will host the launch of the 2016 Virginia Buzzkill campaign, a joint law enforcement agency awareness initiative of the Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (VACLEA) to deter underage drinking, and educate everyone about the consequences of providing alcohol to underage individuals.

Norfolk State University Police, along with law enforcement personnel from Christopher Newport University, Hampton University and Tidewater Community College will hold a 10 a.m. press conference on Sept. 2 at the NSU Student Center. The event will occur in advance of the college football and tailgating seasons at many higher education institutions in the Tidewater area.

“It’s very important for students under the age of 21 to refrain from using alcohol because it is has serious consequences that could negatively impact their pursuit of an education,” said Norfolk State University Police Chief Troy Covington. “We as law enforcement professionals want our students to be safe, so we are providing them with the right information so they can make good decisions.”

Covington said underage alcohol consumption by an individual can lead to loss of scholarships, financial aid, suspension and or expulsion. But other severe consequences at some colleges and universities could include arrest, court fines and other penalties. The awareness campaign will include social media posts, radio spots and signage to provide the public with information about underage alcohol use. The hashtag for the campus initiative is #PARTYSAFEVA.

Police chiefs and administrators from the respective participating higher education institutions are expected to be in attendance. Some will provide brief comments in reference to the campaign. VA Buzzkill is a Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administration (VACLEA) campaign funded by a Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles highway safety grant.

For more information, see the VA Buzzkill program page or contact the Norfolk State University Office of Communications and Marketing at 757-823-8373 or VACLEA at 804-285-8227 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

2016 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Awards Announced For Best Traffic Safety Programs | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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2016 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Awards Announced For Best Traffic Safety Programs

August 12, 2016 | VACP

News Image The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police (VACP) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2016 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge awards for the best traffic safety programs in the state in 2015.

The awards luncheon will take place during the VACP’s 91st Annual Training Conference on Tuesday, September 20 at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, VA.

Celebrating its twenty-seventh year in Virginia, the Law Enforcement Challenge program promotes professionalism in traffic safety enforcement and encourages agencies to share best practices and programs with each other. The awards are based on entries prepared by the participating agencies that highlight their traffic safety education and enforcement activities in occupant protection, impaired driving and speed over the past calendar year. Judges award points to the agencies in the six areas that comprise a comprehensive traffic safety program: problem identification, policies, planning, training of officers, public information and education, enforcement, and an evaluation of the outcomes of the agency’s efforts.

The Virginia Challenge is held in cooperation with the National Law Enforcement Challenge Awards, which are presented by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). This year, thirty Virginia agencies entered the Challenge, of which eleven were selected to receive national awards — the most of any state in the nation! The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police was also selected for recognition in the National Challenge for its commitment to highway safety and will receive the State Association/Governors Highway Safety Office Award. National awards will be presented October 18 at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference in San Diego, CA.

The Virginia agencies listed below will be presented with their Virginia Challenge first, second and third place awards in each category at the state awards luncheon, as well as special awards for outstanding enforcement and education efforts in the areas of occupant protection, impaired driving, speed awareness, commercial motor vehicle safety, distracted driving, technology, bicycle/pedestrian safety, and motorcycle safety. Additionally, the VACP will present an award for the most outstanding traffic safety program in Virginia in 2015, regardless of agency size or type — the “Commonwealth Award”.

The Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge Awards program is supported by a grant from the Virginia Highway Safety Office. Additional information about the Law Enforcement Challenge program can be found online at http://www.smartsafeandsober.org/programs/LEC.

The winners of the 2016 Virginia Law Enforcement Challenge are as follows:

Municipal 1: 1-20 Officers

Place

Notes

Saltville Police Department

1

 

Municipal 2: 21-40 Officers

Place

Notes

Ashland Police Department

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
2nd place, Municipal 1 (1-25 Officers)

Radford Police Department

2

 
Bedford Police Department

3

 

Municipal 3: 41-55 Officers

Place

Notes

Herndon Police Department

1

 

Culpeper Police Department

2

 
Colonial Heights Police Department

3

 

Municipal 4: 56-125 Officers

Place

Notes

Harrisonburg Police Department

1

 
Christiansburg Police Department

2

 
Salem Police Department

3

 

Municipal 5: 126-225 Officers

Place

Notes

Roanoke County Police Department

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
2nd place, Municipal 4 (101-350 Officers)

Lynchburg Police Department

2

 
Albemarle County Police Department

3

 

Municipal 6: 226-400 Officers

Place

Notes

Roanoke Police Department

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
3rd place, Municipal 4 (101-350 Officers)

Arlington County Police Department

2

2016 NLEC Winner:
3rd place, Municipal 5 (351 or More Officers)

Chesapeake Police Department

3

 

Municipal 7: 401-650 Officers

Place

Notes

Henrico County Division of Police

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
1st place, Municipal 5 (351 or More Officers)

Municipal 8: 651+ Officers

Place

Notes

Virginia Beach Police Department

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
2nd place, Municipal 5 (351 or More Officers) &
Bike/Ped Safety Award

Fairfax County Police Department

2

 

 

Sheriff 1: 1-20 Deputies

Place

Notes

no entries

--

 

Sheriff 2: 21-40 Deputies

Place

Notes

Westmoreland County Sheriff's Office

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
1st place, Sheriff 1 (1-50 Deputies)

New Kent County Sheriff's Office

2

 

Sheriff 3: 41-80 Deputies

Place

Notes

no entries

--

 

Sheriff 4: 81-160 Deputies

Place

Notes

Gloucester County Sheriff's Office

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
1st place, Sheriff 2 (51-150 Deputies)
Fauquier County Sheriff's Office

2

 

Sheriff 5: 161-300 Deputies

Place

Notes

Hanover County Sheriff's Office

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
3rd place, Sheriff 3 (151 or More Deputies)

Stafford County Sheriff's Office

2

 

Sheriff 6: 301 or More Deputies

Place

Notes

no entries

--

 
 

Military Police

Place

Notes

Fort Eustis Police

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
3rd place, Military

Fort Lee Police

2

 

Special Enforcement

Place

Notes

Metro Washington Airports Authority Police Department

1

2016 NLEC Winner:
1st place, Special Law Enforcement (1-25 Officers)

 

University Police

Place

Notes

Virginia Commonwealth University Police Department

1

 

 

State Association/Highway Safety Office Award (NATIONAL CHALLENGE ONLY)

Place

Notes

Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police

1

 

 

Contacts:

Ms. Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: (804) 338-9512; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Ms. Erin Schrad, Communications Manager
Mobile: (804) 512-5162; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

VACP President Williamsburg Police Chief Dave Sloggie Announces Retirement | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP President Williamsburg Police Chief Dave Sloggie Announces Retirement

August 11, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image Williamsburg Police Chief David C. Sloggie announced today his plans to retire on January 1, 2017 after 40 years in law enforcement.

A native of Newport News, Chief Sloggie joined the Williamsburg Police Department on August 1, 1976 and was sworn in exactly one month later on his 21st birthday. He has served his entire 40-year career in law enforcement with the City of Williamburg, including six years as Chief, thirteen years as Deputy Chief, and fourteen years as Uniform Bureau Major. 

Chief Sloggie was instrumental in the early phases of the Williamsburg Police Department becoming an accredited agency. He was also an assessor for the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA®) in 1992-93, which selected the WPD to be a Flagship Agency in 2009.

Chief Sloggie holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminology from Saint Leo College and an MPA in Justice Administration from Golden Gate University. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Local Government Management from Virginia Tech.  Sloggie is a 1985 graduate of the FBI National Academy, a 1992 graduate of the United States Secret Service Dignitary Protection School, and a 1996 graduate of the Police Executive Leadership School at the University of Richmond.

Chief Sloggie was elected to the VACP Executive Board as Third Vice President in 2012 and ascended through the chairs to become President in 2015. He has also served for many years on the VACP Awards Committee, with several years as Chairman. 

Chief Sloggie is the third Williamsburg Police Chief in succession who was elected to serve as President of the VACP.  His predecessor, Chief J. Michael Yost, was VACP President from 2006-2007. Yost's predecessor, Chief Larry Vardell, was VACP President from 1990-91.  (It is also worth noting that two former Williamsburg deputy police chiefs who became chiefs at other agencies also were elected to serve as VACP President. Retired Waynesboro Police Chief Douglas L. Davis, 2010-11 VACP President, was deputy chief under Yost and retired Fredericksburg Police Chief James W. Powers, 1999-2000 VACP President, was deputy chief under Vardell.)

In retirement, Chief Sloggie looks forward to spending more time with his wife, Maureen, and his children and grandchildren, and also exploring other professional opportunities.

Virginia State Police Announces Deputy Superintendent Retirement & New Appointment | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Virginia State Police Announces Deputy Superintendent Retirement & New Appointment

August 5, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendent, announced today the retirement of current Deputy Superintendent, Lt. Colonel Robert B. Northern. Also announced was the appointment of Lt. Colonel Tracy S. Russillo to the position of second in command of the Department.

Lt. Col. Northern has served as the Deputy Superintendent for the past 11 years, since being appointed by Col. Flaherty in July 2005. During his 36 years with the Department, Northern has served in many capacities including:  Deputy Director of the Bureau of Field Operations; division commander of the Culpeper Bureau of Field Operations (BFO) Headquarters; lieutenant and staff assistant to the Director of BFO; First sergeant in the Hanover/Henrico Area 1 Office; Sergeant in the Bowling Green Area 44 Office; and as a trooper stationed in Fredericksburg Area 5 Office and in Area 1.  He also served seven years on the Executive Protection Unit, which provides security for the Governors of Virginia and their families.  From 1990 until 1993, he was assigned to the Governor’s Office to coordinate Virginia’s anti-drug programs. Northern’ s retirement is effective Sept. 1, 2016.

“I would first like to thank Colonel Flaherty for providing me with the opportunity over the last 11 years to serve as Deputy Superintendent,” said Northern. “Nothing has made me more proud over the years or given me any more satisfaction than being a Virginia State Trooper. Since 1951, my father and I have served the Department, and I hate to see that legacy come to a close. But, now is the opportunity for me and my family to pursue new adventures, and for the State Police to progress towards the future with talented, new leadership.”

Replacing Northern will be the current Bureau of Administrative Staff and Support (BASS) Director, Lt. Colonel Russillo. Flaherty promoted her to the position of BASS Director Dec. 25, 2015. Russillo, a native of Fredericksburg, joined the Department May 16, 1989. Her first patrol assignment as a trooper was in Spotsylvania County Area 5 Office and she spent an additional two years patrolling Culpeper County Area 15 Office. As she progressed through the VSP ranks, Russillo has served as an Academy sergeant in Richmond and area commander of the Winchester Area 13 Office before she was promoted to field lieutenant in the Culpeper Division. In 2008, she achieved the rank of captain serving as the Fairfax Division commander in the Northern Virginia region. Russillo was promoted to major in 2011 following her appointment as BASS Deputy Director.

# # #

Corinne N. Geller
Public Relations Director
Virginia State Police
(Office) 804-674-2789
(Cell) 804-263-5547
Web: www.vsp.virginia.gov

Gregory Brown Named Leesburg’s Next Chief of Police | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Gregory Brown Named Leesburg’s Next Chief of Police

July 27, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image Brown, currently with the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, will begin his new position on October 3, 2016.

Leesburg, VA (July 26, 2016) – Town Manager Kaj Dentler announced today that Gregory Brown has been selected as the Town’s new Chief of Police.  He will begin his duties on October 3, 2016.

A Captain with the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, Greg Brown is currently commander of the Eastern Loudoun Station. Mr. Brown has been with the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office since 1997. During his time with Loudoun County, he has served as a patrol deputy, School Resource Officer, criminal investigator, and an undercover officer in vice, narcotics and gangs. He subsequently served as a supervisor in each of these units as well as a member of the Emergency Response Team (SWAT), and the Honor Guard.  In addition, he has served as the Deputy Director overseeing all Basic Law Enforcement Training at the Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy.  Prior to joining the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, Mr. Brown was an officer with the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority Police Department.

Mr. Brown holds a Master’s Degree in Justice Administration from the University of Louisville and a Bachelor’s Degree from Ramapo College of New Jersey. He is a graduate of University of Louisville’s Southern Police Institute’s Administrative Officers Course where he obtained a Graduate Certificate in Police Executive Leadership.  Additionally, Greg recently completed the Mentoring Potential Chief Executive Officers Program which is a comprehensive two-year program co-sponsored by Cedarville University and the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives.   He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), and Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity Inc.

"I am both honored and humbled to have been chosen as the Town of Leesburg's next chief of police,” Mr. Brown commented. “I look forward to serving and partnering with the community beside the men and women of the Leesburg Police Department in order to further solidify a culture of trust and legitimacy with the citizens, visitors, and businesses of our town."

The recruitment and selection process used to hire the Town’s new police chief was designed to be both deliberate and inclusive. The Town retained the professional services of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) to manage the search process which included the involvement of individual stakeholders and the community at-large to develop a position profile. More than eighty candidates applied for the position of which twenty-one candidates were selected for telephone interviews. Six candidates were then selected for on-site interviews before two (2) finalists were selected for further consideration. The finalists were interviewed by the Town Council, and participated in a forum with a community panel. The Town Manager then met individually with each of the finalists before making the decision to hire Mr. Brown.

Dentler stated that “Mr. Brown distinguished himself throughout the process as the best candidate for the position of police chief. His professional integrity and approach to community policing in the 21st century along with his broad experience with the County of Loudoun Sheriff’s Office were important factors in the selection process. I look forward to working with Mr. Brown  in the police department’s mission to serve and protect the community”.

A swearing in ceremony is expected to be scheduled for late September.

VACP recommends shrouding of badges in support of Baton Rouge police officers | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP recommends shrouding of badges in support of Baton Rouge police officers

July 17, 2016 | VACP

News Image The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is recommending that all Virginia law enforcement officers shroud their badges in support of the fallen and injured officers in Baton Rouge, La. Shrouding is recommended through the day of the last funeral service — Monday, July 25.

Funeral arrangements set for officers Matthew Gerald, Montrell Jackson and Brad Garafola

BATON ROUGE — Funeral arrangements have been announced for Baton Rouge Police officers Matthew Gerald and Montrell Jackson, and East-Baton Rouge Sheriff’s deputy Brad Garafola. The men were killed Sunday morning on Airline Highway when a gunman opened fired. 

Matthew Gerald

The former Marine and Blackhawk crew chief leaves behind a wife and a 3-year-old daughter. Officer Gerald was 41 years old.

Two public viewing have been set for Officer Matthew Gerald:

Thursday, July 21, from 5 to 9 p.m.
Resthaven Gardens of Memory & Funeral Home, 11817 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge.

Friday, July 22, from 9-11 a.m.
Healing Place Church, 19202 Highland Rd., Baton Rouge.

The service will be on Friday, July 22 beginning at 11 a.m. at Healing Place Church, 19202 Highland Rd., Baton Rouge.

Officer Matthew Gerald will be buried at Louisiana National Cemetary, 303 W. Mount Pleasant, Zachary, LA.

Montrell Jackson

Officer Jackson was a 10 year veteran of the Baton Rouge Police Department. He leaves behind a wife and a four-month-old son.

Jackson’s visitation is Monday, July 25, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Living faith Christian center, 6375 Winbourne Avenue BRLA

The service to follow beginning at 11 a.m.

Brad Garafola

Deputy Brad Garafola was a father of four. He’s also described as a good family man. Deputy Garafola was a 24-year-old veteran with the Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office.

Visitation for Garafola is Saturday, July 23, from noon to 2 p.m.
Istrouma Baptist Church, 10500 Sam Rushing Drive Baton Rouge

Services to follow starting at 2 p.m.

There will be no graveside service, but there will be a processional from Istrouma to Greenoaks Funeral Home. The family requests that any flowers or arrangements be delivered to the church that Saturday.

A memorial has been set up for Garafola in front of EBRSO Headquarters, 8900 Jimmy Wedell Dr.


Officials confirm 3 law enforcement officers dead, 2 suspects at large

THIS STORY IS STILL DEVELOPING. See WAFB.COM for latest.

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) —

White House officials say the President has been briefed and is being updated. He has offered any assistance necessary to Baton Rouge officials. Governor John Bel Edwards will hold a press conference at 3 p.m.We will be streaming the conference live here and on Facebook

“This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing," said Gov. Edwards. "Rest assured, every resource available to the State of Louisiana will be used to ensure the perpetrators are swiftly brought to justice. For now, I’m asking all Louisianans to join Donna and me in praying for the officers who were involved and their families as the details continue to unfold.”

Officials confirm that three law enforcement officers have died and several others were injured during an early morning shooting. They also say one suspect is dead and believe it is possible two other suspects are at large.

Five of the officers were transported to Our Lady of the Lake Hospital where three officers died. Two officers remain at the hospital and one is reportedly in fair condition and the other is in critical condition.

Another officer was transported to the Baton Rouge General. The condition of that officer is unknown at this time.

A witness described hearing at least 25 to 30 gunshots in the area of the B Quick store on Airline Hwy. It started shortly before 9 a.m. Sunday morning.

“I walked out into the street to see what was going on, there was a man lying in the street," the witness said. "I assume he was dead because he wasn’t moving."

The witness believes the shooting started before police arrived and said, "this was not a come at police shooting."

During a call to dispatch an officer said, "unknown where the shots are coming from."

Investigators are working to determine how many shooters were possibly involved.

“We do know, and do believe there are more than one suspect. That’s why we’re alerting the community,” said Cpl. L'Jean McKneely. “We sending in the robot to see if there are any explosives in the area or any explosives on him.”

Officers with the Baton Rouge Police Department and the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff's Office both responded to the scene. Law enforcement officers with both agencies were struck during gunfire.

The scene was contained shortly after 10 a.m., but it is still an active area. Officials are asking the public to avoid the area and to contact law enforcement if you see anything suspicious around your area.

Tensions have been high between member of the Baton Rouge community and law enforcement since Alton Sterling was shot and killed by police July 5. It is unclear whether this incident is connected to the Sterling incident.

Alton Sterling shooting: A comprehensive timeline of events

“We have to heal from this hurt,” said Rep. C. Denise Marcelle. “I’m calling upon everyone to pray today and to cease protests.”

Messages from across the globe have been coming in to the WAFB newsroom. 

"Watching your live broadcast in London. My heart goes out to all in your city, the public, law enforcement, first responders and to all at WAFB. I really feel for you all at this difficult time. It really saddens me to again turn on the news and hear of another shooting in the US specifically against law enforcement. I pray peace comes to you all soon." 

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

Two years after Ferguson, what’s changed for police, activists? | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Two years after Ferguson, what’s changed for police, activists?

July 12, 2016 | Virginia News

By ROBERT ZULLO | Richmond Times-Dispatch

Experts in police training and policy debate the merits of “warrior” vs. “guardian” mindsets in shaping how officers should approach their jobs.

Perhaps nothing better illustrates that difficult dichotomy than the situation Dallas police faced Thursday, caught in a planned attack that killed five officers and wounded seven others as they worked to ensure that a protest ignited by police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota this week remained peaceful.

“Police officers were there protecting and making sure the protests were peaceful, and they were getting shot at,” said Chernoh Wurie, a 35-year-old former Prince William County police officer and a professor of criminal justice at Virginia Commonwealth University.

“It was sickening. I was saddened for the victims, I was saddened for the police officers. We’ve got to start looking for solutions. We have to find a mediator for the community and the police. Who’s going to build that trust again?”

Wurie, who grew up in Sierra Leone and came to the U.S. as a teenager, said the officer-involved shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota and subsequent calculated massacre of police in Dallas left him battling “a lot of mixed emotions and feelings” as a black man and former police officer.

“I’m definitely hurt and praying for all sides,” he said. “We have a lot of work to do.”

***

Two years since the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., social media, news cycles and political reactions have lurched from one controversial police encounter to the next. But what has changed?

In Virginia, law enforcement agencies are keenly aware of fissures between police departments and the communities they serve and are exploring ways to improve how officers work and relate to the public, said Dana Schrad, executive director of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police.

The nonprofit group issued a statement Friday, even as it mourned the deaths of officers in Dallas, committing to “enhancing both basic and in-service training to address proper use of force, crisis de-escalation, racial bias and police-community relations, and in examining our hiring and disciplinary procedures.”

“It takes a lot of good, sophisticated training, which is expensive,” Schrad said. “Budgets continue to decline, while expectations of the public continue to increase. ... In this environment, it’s hard to get people to want to come into policing as a career choice.”

Schrad said the association is working with the Virginia Attorney General’s Office and the Department of Public Safety to add new training curriculum involving the use of force, defusing crisis situations, and improving the integrity of internal affairs investigations. Those subjects have come to the fore as the result of high-profile police shootings.

“It is a complex conundrum, being good community police while being strong enough to handle crisis,” she said. “That takes a mindset that very few people really ever master well.” ...

Read the full story...

VACP recommends shrouding of badges in support of Dallas police officers | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VACP recommends shrouding of badges in support of Dallas police officers

July 8, 2016 | VACP

News Image The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is recommending that all Virginia law enforcement officers shroud their badges for a week, starting today and ending at midnight, Friday, July 15, in support of the fallen and injured officers in Dallas.

DALLAS POLICE FUNERAL NOTICES

 


MEDIA RELEASE
July 8, 2016
Contact: Dana Schrad, Executive Director
Mobile: 804-338-9512

 

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE CALLS FOR SHROUDING OF BADGES AND  SUPPORTS TRAINING ENHANCEMENTS

The Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police is recommending that all Virginia law enforcement officers shroud their badges for one week effective July 8 in support of the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Department.

We are deeply troubled by the deaths and injuries suffered by the officers who were attacked last night, and send our sincere condolences to the Departments and to the families and friends of the fallen officers.  We also are deeply saddened by the tragic deaths that occurred in Louisiana and Minnesota.  We are confident that thorough investigations will be conducted and that appropriate action will be taken based on the outcome of the investigations.

Serving and protecting the residents of the Commonwealth of Virginia is the primary mission of Virginia’s police agencies, and we continue to stand ready to work with our citizens and community leaders to address the concerns that are prevalent at this time.  We are committed to enhancing both basic and in-service training to address proper use of force, crisis de-escalation, racial bias and police-community relations, and in examining our hiring and disciplinary procedures.

These horrific events have deeply affected the law enforcement profession as well as all Virginians.  We encourage our police chiefs to have open dialogues and create strong avenues of communication with the communities they serve.  We are proud to have police professionals in Virginia who are committed to public service, and who will continue to work hard for the people we serve and protect.

Roanoke County police expand use of beanbag guns following fatal shooting | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Roanoke County police expand use of beanbag guns following fatal shooting

July 6, 2016 | Virginia News

By Amy Friedenberger | The Roanoke Times

A 24-year-old man stood in a driveway on a May afternoon with a machete held over his shoulder. “Kill me,” he yelled at two Roanoke County police officers.

He approached the officers, who pointed their guns at him and asked that he put the machete down, police spokeswoman Amy Whittaker said. They tried to talk to him to calm him down.

Officers deployed a Taser, but it did not work, Whittaker said. A police dog arrived to the house on Copper Circle, which aggravated the man.

He continued to tell police he wanted to die. At one point, he sliced his arm and threatened to cut his stomach and head, Whittaker said.

Eventually, an officer fired three beanbag rounds, striking the man at least once in the hand, Whittaker said. He threw the machete down a few feet away and lay down on the driveway, allowing officers to handcuff him.

“There was a situation that wasn’t that far away from being another tragedy,” Chief Howard Hall said.

The incident happened May 27, just two days after Hall discussed the final results in his department’s investigation into the police shooting death of 18-year-old Kionte Spencer. The shooting prompted the department to review the number of beanbag guns it has and how to expand the less-lethal weapons to more officers. ...
 

Read the full story...

New Firearms Laws Go Into Effect July 1, 2016 | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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New Firearms Laws Go Into Effect July 1, 2016

June 30, 2016 | Virginia News

Concealed Handgun Permit Reciprocity & Background Criminal History Checks for Private Sales

RICHMOND – Among the many new laws going into effect July 1, 2016, will be two that impact Virginia concealed handgun permit holders and those engaging in private firearms transactions at Virginia gun shows.

Virginia Concealed Handgun Permit Reciprocity and Recognition: As of July 1, 2016, the Commonwealth of Virginia will recognize all valid concealed handgun or concealed weapon permits and licenses issued by another state (to include the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the US Virgin Islands) provided the following requirements are met:

  1. The holder of such permit or license is at least 21 years of age; and
  2. The permit or license holder carries a photo identification issued by a government agency of any state or by the U.S. Department of Defense or U.S. Department of State; and
  3. The holder displays the permit or license and such identification upon demand by a law-enforcement officer; and
  4. The permit or license holder has not previously had a Virginia concealed handgun permit revoked.

Although the new law requires Virginia to grant recognition to all states that issue permits, other states are not required to recognize or authorize Virginia permit holders to possess a firearm in their state. For more information on which states recognize Virginia resident and non-resident concealed handgun permits, please go to the Virginia State Police Website at www.vsp.virginia.gov.

Voluntary Criminal Background Checks for Private Transactions at Virginia Firearms Shows: Also effective July 1, 2016, is the opportunity for those privately buying or transferring firearm(s) at a gun show in Virginia to request a criminal background check on the buyer. Code of Virginia 54.1-4201.2 enacted by the 2016 Virginia General Assembly requires the Department of State Police to be available at every firearms show held in the Commonwealth to make, upon request, determinations in accordance with Code of Virginia 18.2-308.2:2 of whether a prospective purchaser or transferee is prohibited under state or federal law from possession of a firearm in private transactions. A background check in a private sale ensures that the gun is transferred only to a person lawfully eligible to possess firearms and provides evidence to the seller of diligence to protect against the illegal transfer of firearms.

Participation in these background checks is strictly optional and based upon agreement entered into by the firearms seller and recipient. Additional state police personnel will be set up on-site at firearms shows to provide the background check for a fee of $2. The recipient will be required to complete a form attesting to their eligibility to possess firearms and present one, valid, government-issued photo ID (i.e. driver’s license, Virginia Identification card) or military documentation. The background check verification conducted through the Virginia Firearms Transaction Center takes approximately three minutes to complete.

For additional information on one’s eligibility to purchase a firearm in the Commonwealth, please go to http://www.vsp.state.va.us/Firearms_PurchaseEligibility.shtm

# # #

Former New Kent sheriff recognized with lifetime achievement award | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Former New Kent sheriff recognized with lifetime achievement award

June 29, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image Former sheriff F.W. "Wakie" Howard Jr was honored by Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Richard Holcomb on Wednesday for outstanding service during his 36-year tenure in New Kent County.

Howard received the "Lifetime Achievement Award," which was presented during the 2016 Governor's Transportation Safety Awards at the Virginia’s Executive Mansion, according to a Virginia DMV news release.

Howard received one of 12 Governor’s Transportation Safety Awards, which were awarded by the DMV’s Highway Safety Office.

Howard was elected as sheriff in 1979 and served nine terms before retiring in December 2015. When elected, Howard was the youngest sheriff in the state. He was also the longest serving sheriff among Virginia’s sheriffs upon his retirement.

During his career, Howard served on numerous local, state and national safety committees and was a strong supporter of transportation safety in the Virginia. He has testified or had representatives from his department testify at the General Assembly on various transportation safety topics, the release said.

Howard, his department and his staff received countless awards and recognitions at the state and national levels during his tenure as sheriff, the release said. 

“We are happy to take this time to recognize the impressive efforts made by Virginians to help make an impact on the safety of everyone who shares our roadways,” said Holcomb, who is also the governor’s highway safety representative. “What these folks are doing is saving lives and for that, we are very grateful.”

Source: The Tidewater Review

VCU Police wins Governor’s Transportation Safety Award for third time | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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VCU Police wins Governor’s Transportation Safety Award for third time

June 29, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image Gov. Terry McAuliffe honored the VCU Police Department this week for its continued progress in promoting safe and sober driving practices in and around Virginia Commonwealth University.

A dozen individuals and agencies were recognized Monday at the governor’s mansion for a variety of traffic safety achievements across the commonwealth.

VCU Police won a Governor’s Transportation Safety Award in the law enforcement category for programs and enforcement efforts completed in 2015. The department won the same award in 2013 and 2015.

VCU Police Capt. Howard “Mike” O’Berry and Capt. Sean Ingram, who oversee operations and patrol, respectively, accepted the award on behalf of VCU’s 92 sworn officers who implemented initiatives and enforce traffic laws year round.

“Each year we look for new ways to educate the community about safe driving and we really went all-out in 2015,” O’Berry said after the ceremony. “It’s an honor to receive the award and a testament to our partnerships in Richmond that help us reach a broader audience of drivers.”

In 2015, VCU Police launched RVA Buzzkill, a multimedia campaign to educate college students in the greater Richmond area about the long-term consequences of underage alcohol consumption.

VCU Police partnered with the Richmond Police Department as well as police departments at the University of Richmond, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and Virginia Union University to send a clear message to college-aged residents: Serve under 21 and the party’s over.

“RVA Buzzkill brought police agencies together to address similar, alcohol-related problems and to be proactive about educating younger city residents,” O’Berry said. “Students don’t always realize the financial and professional costs associated with impaired driving and our goal was to communicate those in as many ways as we could.”

RVA Buzzkill’s multimedia efforts included billboard signage on GRTC buses, radio ads, social media posts and signage for residence halls and medians in the roadway.

Also in 2015, the department participated in educational programs such as Buckle Up, Phone Down to deter texting and driving. It routinely partnered with the Virginia State Police, Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and DRIVE SMART Virginia.

The Governor’s Transportation Safety Awards, established in 1993, recognize individuals and public and private organizations that have made extraordinary contributions to transportation safety in Virginia. Award winners are determined by the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles’ Highway Safety Office.

Longtime South Hill police chief to retire | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Longtime South Hill police chief to retire

June 28, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image After 47 years in law enforcement, South Hill Police Chief Norman J. Hudson plans to hang up his badge for retirement. His last day will be July 30.

Mayor Earl Horne made the announcement at the end of Monday night’s meeting of the South Hill Town Council.

Hudson joined the South Hill Police Department as chief in 1984 after spending 15 years in law enforcement in Richmond.

“This has been a great job. The town has been good to me,” said Hudson. There was no one event that prompted Hudson to announce his retirement: “I just really decided it was time.”

Horne, who worked with Hudson during his tenure, said he was not surprised by Hudson’s decision. “I hated to see it, but I understand.”

The mayor lauded Hudson for his work, saying, “I couldn’t have asked for a better chief of police. He had the greatest dedication, always going beyond that extra mile to make the citizens safe. During his time, he hired some of the best officers. I believe we have one of the best, if not the best, police departments in southern Virginia.”

Horne and Hudson had an especially close working relationship because South Hill is one of only three towns in Virginia where the chief of police is appointed by and answers directly to the mayor.

“Times have changed and I felt it was time for us to change as well. We are only one of three towns where the Mayor could walk in and fire the police chief at will. It’s [the amendment of the town charter] been approved by the General Assembly.” As of July 1, the police chief will answer to the Town Manager, but only after his or her hiring is approved by Town Council.

In addition to his duties as chief, Hudson has served on the board of the Central Virginia Police Training Academy in Lynchburg since 1991 and as chair of the board since 2009.

“I’ve enjoyed being able to work with the men and women going through training,” he said.

In 2014, in celebration of his then-nearly 46 years in law enforcement, Fifth District Congressman Robert Hurt and Virginia Del. T. Scott Garrett of Lynchburg presented Hudson with a United States flag that has flown over the Capitol in Washington.

“It’s been a good 47 years,” said Hudson, adding he plans to spend retirement traveling and tending to his horses, cows, goats and dogs on his farm.

Hudson said he will not be involved in picking his successor. That job will fall to the Mayor, at least until his retirement on June 30, and to Town Manager Kim Callis and members of Town Council.

Source URL: http://www.sovanow.com/index.php?/news/article/longtime_south_hill_police_chief_to_retire/

Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook Announces Retirement | Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police
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Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook Announces Retirement

June 28, 2016 | Virginia News

News Image City’s first African American Chief to step down Oct. 1.

The Alexandria Police Department announced late Friday that Police Chief Earl Cook will retire in October after more than 37 years of service to the city.

Cook was appointed chief of police in 2009, the first African-American to hold the position in Alexandria. He began as a police academy recruit in 1979 with APD, and worked his way up to assistant chief, in charge of managing the criminal investigations bureau.

“Chief Cook has devoted his entire career to this community, and we are indebted to him for his dedication and service,” said City Manager Mark Jinks in a statement. “Alexandria’s high quality of life and historically low crime rates are due in large part to Chief Cook’s leadership and the outstanding staff under his decades of command.”

Cook is a native Alexandrian, and grew up on Princess Street. He attended Lyles-Crouch and Mount Vernon elementary schools, Parker-Gray Middle School and George Washington High School through 10th grade. He transferred to T.C. Williams High School after it was integrated, and played on the 1971 state championship football team immortalized in the Disney film “Remember the Titans.”

“As a lifelong Alexandrian, it’s been an incredible honor to serve this very special community,” Cook said in a statement. “I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had to pursue a rewarding career and work with some of the finest men and women in law enforcement. My retirement is bittersweet; however, I look forward to the future challenges in my life.”

The city has retained the International Association of Chiefs of Police to recruit Cook’s successor from inside the Alexandria Police Department and across the nation. The search will include input from stakeholders throughout the community; and officials said additional details will be announced as they are developed.

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Chief Cook's email to the Alexandria Police Department announcing his retirement:

“It is with mixed emotions that I announce my retirement from our Department. October 1st will be my last day of work with the Agency. I have dedicated two-thirds of my life to what I consider the most honorable of professions. It has been challenging, exciting and rewarding all at once. I chose to work and serve in my home town and I have never regretted that decision. The citizens I’ve worked with, the many friends in the Community allowed us to work together to make this a safe city with an enviable quality of life. The relationships close to my heart are and will always be the hundreds of APD employees it has been my honor to work with along the way. My pride in their dedication and service, especially those who gave their lives, will remain a cherished memory. For all who still work today, you are our legacy. You are the best. I leave feeling confident of each of your competencies and leadership that will expand on our past successes and reputation. I look forward to following your many accomplishments in the coming years.”

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